democratic

See also: Democratic and democràtic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French democratique (pertaining to democracy, democratic) (modern French démocratique), and its etymon Late Latin democraticus (pertaining to democracy, democratic; democrat), from Ancient Greek δημοκρᾰτῐκός (dēmokratikós, of or for democracy; favouring or suited for democracy), from δημοκρᾰτῐ́ᾱ (dēmokratíā, democracy) + -ῐκός (-ikós, suffix with the sense ‘of or pertaining’ to forming adjectives).[1] Δημοκρᾰτῐ́ᾱ (Dēmokratíā) is derived from δῆμος (dêmos, the common people; free citizens, sovereign people; popular assembly; popular government, democracy) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *deh₂- (to divide; to share)) + -κρᾰτῐ́ᾱ (-kratíā, suffix meaning ‘government; rule’) (from κρᾰ́τος (krátos, might, strength; dominion, power) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kret- (insight, intelligence; strength)) + -ῐ́ᾱ (-íā, suffix forming feminine abstract nouns)).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

democratic (comparative more democratic, superlative most democratic)

  1. Pertaining to democracy; constructed upon or in line with the principle of government chosen by the people.
    Synonym: (archaic) democratical
    Antonyms: nondemocratic, undemocratic
    The United States is a democratic country, as the citizens are allowed to choose leaders to represent their interests.
    • 1599, [James IV of Scotland (later also James I of England)], “Of a Kings Dvtie in His Office. The Second Booke.”, in ΒΑΣΙΛΙΚΟΝ ΔΩΡΟΝ [BASILIKON DŌRON]. Or His Maiesties Instrvctions to His Dearest Sonne, Henry the Prince, London: [] Felix Kyngston, for Iohn Norton, [], published 1603, OCLC 913285353, pages 39–40:
      [S]ome firie ſpirited men in the Miniſterie, got ſuch a guiding of the people at that time of confuſion, as finding the guſte of gouernment ſweete, they begouth to fantaſie to themſelues, a Democratick forme of gouernment: [] and after vſurping the libertie of the time in my long minoritie, ſetled themſelues ſo faſt vpon that imagined Democracie, as they fed themſelues with the hope to become Trbuni plebis: and ſo in a populare gouernment by leading the people by the noſe, to beare the ſway of all the rule.
    • 1658, John Gauden, Funerals Made Cordials: In a Sermon Prepared and (in Part) Preached at the Solemn Interment of the Corps of the Right Honorable Robert Rich, Heire Apparent to the Earldom of Warwick. [], London: [] T. C. for Andrew Crook, [], OCLC 1121349784, page 82:
      [W]hich government in its due conſtitution no Chriſtian or reformed Church, (not wholly under a democratick or popular ſpirit) yea no one eminent reformed Divine but did highly approve and deſire the happineſs to enjoy, as hath been made evident by their writings.
    • 1668, Abraham Philotheus [pseudonym], Anarchie Reviving, or, The Good Old Cause on the Anvile. [], London: [s.n.], OCLC 503842759, page 2:
      Others avouch plainly the Democratick Principles, That Government riſes from the People's Conſent, and is radically founded in them; []
    • 1777 (erroneously indicated as 1677), [William Combe], “Additions to the Diaboliad, a Poem”, in The Diaboliad, a Poem Dedicated to the Worst Man in His Majesty’s Dominions, 2nd edition, London: [] G. Kearsly, [], OCLC 752590105, page 13:
      There, fann’d by me, lewd Faction’s quick’ning flame / Inſpires my duteous Children to defame / Thoſe Laws of Freedom which ſo long have ſtood, / Fix’d in the cement of Britannia’s blood. / There, my ſubverting Delegates diſplay / The madding pride of Democratic ſway.
    • 1788, Publius [pseudonym; James Madison], “Number X. The Same Subject Continued [The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection].”, in The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution, [] , volume I, New York, N.Y.: [] J. and A. M‘Lean, [], OCLC 642792893, page 60:
      The other point of difference is, the greater number of citizens and extent of territory which may be brought within the compaſs of republican, than of democratic government; and it is this circumſtance principally which renders factious combinations leſs to be dreaded in the former, than in the latter.
    • 1791 August 3, [Edmund Burke], An Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs, [], London: [] J[ames] Dodsley, [], OCLC 4875619, page 120:
      The democratick commonwealth is the foodfull nurſe of ambition. [] Whenever, in ſtates which have had a democratick baſis, they have endeavoured to put reſtraints upon ambition, their methods were as violent, as in the end they were ineffectual; as violent indeed as any the moſt jealous deſpotiſm could invent.
    • 1809, [John Thornton Kirkland], “Notices of the Life and Character of Fisher Ames”, in Fisher Ames, Works of Fisher Ames. [], Boston, Mass.: T. B. Wait & Co. [], OCLC 625264172, page xxiv:
      The division of the legislature into two branches and their diverse origin, the long duration of office in one branch, the distinct power of the executive, the independence and permanency of the judiciary are designed to balance and check the democratick tendencies of our polity.
    • 1817–1820, [William Pinnock], “Of Bœotia and Attica”, in A Catechism of Universal History, Containing a Summary Account of the Various States, &c. &c. which Have Existed from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time (Pinnock’s Catechism), 6th edition, London: [] [F]or Pinnock and Maunder, Mentorian Press, []; by C. Green, [], OCLC 32379551, page 44:
      Q. Who liberated Athens from the power of Sparta? / A. Thrasy[b]ulus, having expelled the usurpers, established the democratic government, B.C. 401.
    • 1835, Lyman Cobb, “Lesson CCXVIII. Political Definitions.”, in The North American Reader; [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 669396963, paragraph 10, page 473:
      In the United States, the federal and democratick parties divided the country till the termination of the last war.
    • 1994 October, Muthiah Alagappa, “Summary”, in Anne Stewart, editor, Democratic Transition in Asia: The Role of the International Community (East–West Center Special Reports; no. 3), Honolulu, Hi.: East–West Center, OCLC 31475119, page 5:
      In the conception of the Clinton administration and pro-democracy advocates, democracy and human rights are inextricably linked and mutually reinforcing. Human rights, defined in terms of the individual's political rights and civil liberties, are key ingredients of democracy. Without these rights, the integrity of participation and competition—vital aspects of the democratic system—cannot be guaranteed. The protection of human rights "is the best safeguard against the abuse of national power," it is argued, and only democratic government can guarantee their protection.
    • 2001, Gregory Houston; Ian Liebenberg, “Introduction”, in Gregory Houston, editor, Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng: Human Sciences Research Council, →ISBN, page 9:
      The tradition that public policy would be democratic in its formulation was carried into the new democracy when the ANC [African National Congress] came to power in 1994.
    • 2005, “Introduction”, in Antonio F. Perez, Sémou Pathé Gueye, and Fenggang Yang, editors, Civil Society as Democratic Practice (Cultural Heritage and Contemporary Change Series VII, Seminar, Culture and Values; 22), Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, →ISBN, page 2:
      Beyond and in dialogue with the political and the economic, this active engagement and creative expression of the people constitutes authentic democratic process.
    • 2019 July 21, Meron Rapoport, “When Zionism Imagined Jewish Nationalism without Supremacy”, in +972 Magazine[1], Tel Aviv, Israel: 972 – Advancement of Citizen Journalism, archived from the original on 10 August 2021:
      Both [Ze’ev] Jabotinsky and [David] Ben-Gurion also wrote songs of praise to the Ottoman Empire, its tolerance toward ethnic minorities in general—and to Jews in particular—as well as to the democratic changes it was undergoing.
  2. Exhibiting social equality; egalitarian.
    Antonyms: nondemocratic, undemocratic
    • 1867 February, the author of “Watching and Waiting”, “Pauline”, in T[imothy] S[hay] Arthur and Virginia F[rancis] Townsend, editor, Arthur’s Home Magazine, volume XXIX, Philadelphia, Penn.: T. S. Arthur & Co., OCLC 639960312, chapter III (Pauline’s First Experience in Boarding ’Round), page 109, column 1:
      "Oh, I hold with the framers of the Constitution, that all men are created free and equal; likewise, all boys and girls," said democratic Kitty; []
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, “The Gateway, and Some Who Passed”, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 29:
      Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, [] Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.
  3. (US, politics) Alternative letter-case form of Democratic (of, pertaining to, or supporting the Democratic Party)
    Mount Vernon is run by a strong democratic party organization.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

democratic (plural democratics)

  1. (chiefly in the plural, dated) Synonym of democrat (a supporter of democracy; an advocate of democratic politics (originally (historical) as opposed to the aristocrats in Revolutionary France))
    Synonyms: (obsolete) democratical, democratist
    • 1692, Gershom Bulkeley, “Will and Doom, or The Miseries of Connecticut by and under an Usurped and Arbitrary Power. []”, in Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society, volume III, Hartford, Conn.: [] [Connecticut Historical] Society, published 1895, OCLC 17881052, page 195:
      This kingly government (as some call it) is a thing that our democraticks cannot brook: we are an undone people if we do not down with that.
    • 1760, Delahay Gordon, “The Life and Death of King Charles the First”, in A General History of the Lives, Trials, and Executions of All the Royal and Noble Personages, that have Suffered in Great-Britain and Ireland for High Treason, or Other Crimes, from the Accession of Henry VIII. to the Throne of England, down to the Present Time; [], volume III, London: [] J. Burd, [], page 440:
      [] [Thomas] Fairfax was made general of all the forces both in England and Ireland; and Rainsbrough [i.e., Thomas Rainsborough], a leveller, and a violent head of the democraticks, high-admiral.
    • 1789 October 10, “Paris”, in I[ohann] W[ilhelm] von Archenholz, editor, The British Mercury, or Annals of History, Politics, Manners, Literature, Arts, etc. of the British Empire, volume XI, number 41, Hamburg: [] B. C. Hoffman, OCLC 42391447, page 39:
      Several circumſtances have concurred to confirm the belief that this wretched lunatick was the identical Marquis de Brunoy, who had been buried in the gloom of a priſon for nine years, whilſt the world thought him dead. The mad democraticks began to ſpread reports that the Count de Provence was privy to this tranſaction; and that it was this Prince who had obtained the Lettre de Cachet, by virtue of which this wretched man had been ſo long deprived of the light of heaven.
    • 1811, Aristotle, “The Politics. Book V. Chapter VIII.”, in Thomas Taylor, transl., The Great, and Eudemian, Ethics, the Politics, and Economics, of Aristotle. [], London: [] Robert Wilks, [], OCLC 976724807, page 412:
      For that equality among the multitude which democratics explore, is not only just among those of a similar rank but is advantageous.
    • 1881, Plutarch, “Life of Lysander”, in Aubrey Stewart and George Long, transl., Plutarch’s Lives. [], volume II, London: George Bell and Sons, [], OCLC 1027250921, page 296:
      He [Lysander] now destroyed the democratics and popular constitutions in all the Greek cities which had been subject to Athens, placing a Lacedæmonian in each as harmost or governor, with a council of ten archons under him, composed of men selected from the political clubs which he had established.

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ democratic, adj. and n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “democratic, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further readingEdit


LadinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

democratic m pl

  1. plural of democratich

OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

democratic m (feminine singular democratica, masculine plural democratics, feminine plural democraticas)

  1. democratic

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French démocratique.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

democratic m or n (feminine singular democratică, masculine plural democratici, feminine and neuter plural democratice)

  1. democratic

DeclensionEdit