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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English maken, equivalent to make +‎ -en.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

maken

  1. (obsolete) plural simple present of make
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book XXI:
      & somme englysshe bookes maken mencyon that they wente neuer oute of englond after the deth of syr Launcelot / but that was but fauour of makers
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
      They maken many a wrong chevisaunce,
    • 1606, Nathaniel Baxter, Sir Philip Sydneys Ourania, that is, Endimions Song and Tragedie, containing all Philosophie
      All these Starres maken one hundred and eight,
      Bright and conspicuous without deceite.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch maken, from Old Dutch macon, from Proto-Germanic *makōną.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaːkə(n)/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ken
  • Rhymes: -aːkən

VerbEdit

maken

  1. (transitive) to make
  2. (transitive) to fix, to repair, to mend
  3. (transitive) to take (a photo)

InflectionEdit

Inflection of maken (weak)
infinitive maken
past singular maakte
past participle gemaakt
infinitive maken
gerund maken n
present tense past tense
1st person singular maak maakte
2nd person sing. (jij) maakt maakte
2nd person sing. (u) maakt maakte
2nd person sing. (gij) maakt maakte
3rd person singular maakt maakte
plural maken maakten
subjunctive sing.1 make maakte
subjunctive plur.1 maken maakten
imperative sing. maak
imperative plur.1 maakt
participles makend gemaakt
1) Archaic.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: maak

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

maken

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まけん

KombioEdit

NounEdit

maken

  1. woman
    Yikn ka maken wurun-el.
    You are a woman from the bush.

ReferencesEdit

  • Henry, Joan. Kombio Grammar Essentials. Ms. 123pp. (1992).

Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German maken, from Old Saxon makōn, from Proto-Germanic *makōną. Cognate with Saterland Frisian moakje (to make), West Frisian meitsje (to make), Dutch maken (to make), English make and German machen (to make, do). See also Plautdietsch moaken (diphthongization before velar).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaː.kə(n)/, /ˈmæː.kə(n)/, /ˈmɑː.kə(n)/, /ˈmɒː.kə(n)/ Either the /ə/ or the /n/ may be dropped
  • (Dialects with merger of /ɒː/ and /ɔʊ̯/) IPA(key): /ˈmɔʊ̯.kə(n)/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ken

VerbEdit

maken (past singular möök or makt, past participle makt or maakt, auxiliary verb hebben)

  1. To make.

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch macon, from Proto-Germanic *makōną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

māken

  1. to make
  2. to make, to cause to be

InflectionEdit

Weak
Infinitive māken
3rd sg. past
3rd pl. past
Past participle
Infinitive māken
In genitive mākens
In dative mākene
Indicative Present Past
1st singular māke
2nd singular māecs, mākes
3rd singular māect, māket
1st plural māken
2nd plural māect, māket
3rd plural māken
Subjunctive Present Past
1st singular māke
2nd singular māecs, mākes
3rd singular māke
1st plural māken
2nd plural māect, māket
3rd plural māken
Imperative Present
Singular māec, māke
Plural māect, māket
Present Past
Participle mākende

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • maken (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • maken”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English macian, from Proto-Germanic *makōną.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaːkən/, /ˈmakən/

VerbEdit

maken

  1. To make or create; to have something made.
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Genesis 1:1-2”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      In þe bigynnyng God made of nouȝt heuene and erþe. / Forſoþe þe erþe was idel and voide, and derkneſſis weren on the face of depþe; and the Spiryt of þe Lord was borun on the watris.
      In the beginning, God made the sky and the Earth out of nothing. / The Earth was inactive and empty, and darkness was on top of the seas' surfaces, and the Spirit of the Lord moved on the water.
      a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in The Canterbury Tales, lines 9-12:
      And ſmale foweles maken melodye / That ſlepen al the nyght with open ye / So priketh hem Nature in hir corages / Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages []
      And small birds make song / that sleep all night with their eyes open / (as Nature pokes them in their hearts). / Then people want to go on pilgrimages []

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

maken m

  1. definite singular of make

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

maken m

  1. definite singular of make

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

maken

  1. definite singular of make