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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

13th century. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese estragar, from Vulgar Latin *stragare, from Latin strāges (defeat, slaughter).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

estragar (first-person singular present estrago, first-person singular preterite estraguei, past participle estragado)

  1. (transitive) to spoil, damage, corrupt, waste
    • 1295, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I.E.O.P.F., page 11:
      ouverõ alj outrosi muy grãdes lides conos mouros, et uençerõnos et astragarõ toda essa terra a ferro et a fogo
      they had there other large battles with the Moors, and they defeated them and wasted all that land with fire and iron
    As chuvias estragaron a colleita.
    The rains ruined the harvest.
  2. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to go bad (of foods and commodities)
    Esas laranxas estragáronse.
    These oranges have gone bad.
    Synonym: gorar

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *stragare, from Latin *strago, from Latin strāges (defeat, slaughter).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

estragar (first-person singular present indicative estrago, past participle estragado)

  1. to spoil, damage, corrupt
    As chuvas estragaram a colheita.
    The rains ruined the harvest.
  2. to botch, bungle
    Ele não estraga nada.
    He doesn't screw anything up.
  3. to go bad (of foods and commodities)
    Essas laranjas estragaram.
    These oranges have gone bad.

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

estragar (first-person singular present estrago, first-person singular preterite estragué, past participle estragado)

  1. to corrupt, ruin, spoil, ravage.

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: g becomes a gu before e.

Related termsEdit