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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Circa 1950s? (Please provide an etymology)

VerbEdit

nerf (third-person singular simple present nerfs, present participle nerfing, simple past and past participle nerfed)

  1. (motor racing, transitive) To bump lightly, whether accidentally or purposefully.
    A racer will often nerf another as a psychological tactic.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the Nerf brand of toys designed as non-dangerous counterparts of existing things, such as sports balls and guns.

VerbEdit

nerf (third-person singular simple present nerfs, present participle nerfing, simple past and past participle nerfed)

  1. (transitive, slang, video games) To cripple or weaken an element of a video game during its development (such as a character, a weapon, a spell, etc.).
    Synonym: gimp
    The lightning spell was originally pretty powerful, but in the sequel they nerfed it so it became completely useless.
  2. (transitive, slang) To arbitrarily limit or reduce the capability of.
    • 2019 May 17, Fred Lambert, Electrek[1], retrieved 2019-05-19:
      Tesla nerfs Autopilot in Europe due to new regulations

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

nerf (plural nerfs)

  1. (slang, video games) The weakening or worsening of a character, a weapon, a spell, etc.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier nerve, from Middle Dutch *narwe, either inherited from Old Dutch *narwa or borrowed from Middle Low German narwe, eventually from Proto-Germanic *narwō. For the change of -rwe → -rf, compare verf. Cognate with German Narbe (scar).

NounEdit

nerf f (plural nerven, diminutive nerfje n)

  1. grain of wood
  2. (dated) a similar line in leather, paper, etc.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin nervus. The botanic sense belongs historically to this word, but is semantically close to etymology 1 and hence not necessarily felt as a distinct word.

NounEdit

nerf f (plural nerven, diminutive nerfje n)

  1. (obsolete) nerve
    Synonym: zenuw
  2. (botany) vein of a leaf
Derived termsEdit

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French nerf, from Old French nerf, inherited from Latin nervus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nerf m (plural nerfs)

  1. (anatomy) nerve
  2. (figuratively) force, power, strength
    Les nerfs, les garçons! On n'est pas sur un bateau de plaisance.Put some muscle into it, boys! We are not on a pleasure boat!

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French nerf.

NounEdit

nerf m (plural nerfz)

  1. nerve

DescendantsEdit

  • French: nerf

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nervus.

NounEdit

nerf m (oblique plural ners, nominative singular ners, nominative plural nerf)

  1. nerve
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 185 of this essay:
      Donc lepre est maladie de chair et non pas du cueur, ne des os, de des nerfs etc.
      Therefore leprosy is a disease of the flesh and not of the heart, nor of the bones, nor of the nerves, etc.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin nervus (nerve), from Latin nervus (sinew).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nerf f (plural nerfau)

  1. nerve

Derived termsEdit