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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From late Old French difficile, from Latin difficilis, from dis- + facilis (easy).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile (comparative more difficile, superlative most difficile)

  1. (obsolete) Hard to work with; stubborn.
  2. (obsolete) Difficult.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French difficile, borrowed from Latin difficilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /di.fi.sil/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

difficile (plural difficiles)

  1. difficult
  2. choosy, fussy, picky

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile (comparative plus difficile, superlative le plus difficile)

  1. difficult

AntonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin difficilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile (masculine and feminine plural difficili)

  1. difficult

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From difficilis (difficult, troublesome) +‎ .

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

difficilē (comparative difficilius, superlative difficilissimē)

  1. with difficulty
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of difficilis (difficult, troublesome).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile

  1. nominative neuter singular of difficilis
  2. accusative neuter singular of difficilis
  3. vocative neuter singular of difficilis
  4. (New Latin) Used as a specific epithet

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile m or f (plural difficiles)

  1. difficult

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French difficile, from Latin difficilis.

AdjectiveEdit

difficile m or f

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) difficult

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

difficile m (oblique and nominative feminine singular difficile)

  1. difficult

DescendantsEdit

  • French: difficile
  • Norman: difficile (Jersey, Guernsey)