See also: Moment

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English moment, from Old French moment, from Latin mōmentum. Doublet of momentum and movement.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment (countable and uncountable, plural moments)

  1. A brief, unspecified amount of time.
    Synonyms: stound, instant, trice
    Wait a moment, while I lock the front door.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter V, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., →OCLC:
      Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps, [] , and the light of the reflector fell full upon her.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 6, in A Cuckoo in the Nest:
      Sophia broke down here. Even at this moment she was subconsciously comparing her rendering of the part of the forlorn bride with Miss Marie Lohr's.
    • 2013 June 14, Sam Leith, “Where the profound meets the profane”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 37:
      Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths. Consider for a moment the origins of almost any word we have for bad language – "profanity", "curses", "oaths" and "swearing" itself.
  2. The smallest portion of time; an instant.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter V, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.
  3. (figurative) Weight or importance.
    • c. 1593 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene vii], line 67:
      In deep designs, in matter of great moment, / No less importing than our general good.
    • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], “A Great Storm Described, the Long-Boat Sent to Fetch Water, the Author Goes with It to Discover the Country. []”, in Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], volume I, London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], →OCLC, part II (A Voyage to Brobdingnag), page [176]:
      However, upon a ſtrict Review, I blotted out ſeveral Paſſages of leſs Moment which were in my firſt Copy, for fear of being cenſured as tedious and trifling, whereof Travellers are often, perhaps not without Juſtice, accuſed.
    • 1904, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of the Second Stain, Norton, published 2005, page 1192:
      The document in question is of such immense importance that its publication might very easily – I might almost say probably – lead to European complications of the utmost moment.
    • 1941 May, “Notes and News: William Stroudley”, in Railway Magazine, page 234:
      As to any suggestion that Stroudley's engines were not free-running at high speed, this was of little moment with 60 m.p.h. laid down as the limit at that time.
    • 1951 April, Stirling Everard, “A Matter of Pedigree”, in Railway Magazine, number 600, page 274:
      Britannia therefore has the advantage over only two classes, the rebuilt "Scots" and the "V2s", and in only two respects, maximum axle load (which is important) and weight of tender (which is of little moment).
  4. (physics, mechanics) Ellipsis of moment of force.
    Synonym: torque
  5. (historical, unit) A definite period of time, specifically one-tenth of a point, or one-fortieth or one-fiftieth of an hour.
  6. (neurology, informal) A petit mal episode; such a spell.
  7. (colloquial) A fit; a brief tantrum.
  8. (mathematics) An infinitesimal change in a varying quantity; an increment or decrement.
  9. (mathematics) A quantitative measure of the shape of a set of points.
    If the points represent mass, then the zeroth moment is the total mass, the first moment divided by the total mass is the center of mass, and the second moment is the rotational inertia.
  10. (Internet slang, derogatory, usually preceded by a noun) An embarrassing event, supposed to be characteristic of some person, group, or situation.
    woman moment
    Reddit moment

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, v 3 p 3174. ("The smallest portion of time; an instant." is a direct quote from this Dictionary.)

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin mōmentum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment m (plural moments)

  1. moment (specific instant or time)
    [] el català, malgrat tot, viu un moment de glòria efímera durant els darrers anys del segle XVIII i primers del XIX.
    Catalan, in spite of everything, had a moment of ephemeral glory in the last years of the 18th century and the first ones of the 19th.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment m inan

  1. moment (specific instant or time)

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • moment in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • moment in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch moment, from Middle French moment, from Latin momentum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment n (plural momenten, diminutive momentje n)

  1. moment (very brief period of time)
    Synonym: ogenblik
  2. (physics) moment of force, moment
    Synonym: krachtmoment

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: moment
  • Indonesian: momen

French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mōmentum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment m (plural moments)

  1. moment (point in time)
  2. moment (short period of time)
  3. a while
    Ça fait un moment que je l’attends
    I've been waiting for him for a while
  4. (physics, mechanics) moment, momentum

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mōmentum.

Noun edit

moment m (plural moments)

  1. moment, instant

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Latin momentum, from movere.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment n (definite singular momentet, indefinite plural moment, definite plural momenta)

  1. element, variable, contributing factor or circumstance
    Det er mange moment som spelar inn her.
    There are many variables at play here.
  2. (physics) moment of force

References edit

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mōmentum.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

moment m (plural moments)

  1. moment

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin mōmentum.[1][2][3] First attested in 1592.[4]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment m inan (diminutive momencik)

  1. moment (short period of time)
    Synonym: chwila
  2. moment (specific point or period in time)
    Synonym: chwila
  3. moment (short period of development or continuance of something) [+ w (locative) = in what]
  4. (physics) moment (turning effect of a force applied to a rotational system at a distance from the axis of rotation)
    moment bezwładnościmoment of inertia
    moment gnący / moment zginającybending moment
    moment pęduangular momentum, moment of momentum
    moment siłymoment of force
    moment skręcającytwisting moment
  5. (film, humorous, television) sex scene (segment in a movie in which characters have sex)
  6. (obsolete, mathematics) moment (infinitesimal change in a varying quantity; an increment or decrement)

Declension edit

Interjection edit

moment

  1. (colloquial) wait a minute, wait a moment, wait a second (used when the speaker expects to refrain from speaking or acting for a short time)
    Synonyms: chwila, chwila moment, chwileczkę, momencik

Derived terms edit

adjectives
adverbs

Descendants edit

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), moment is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 12 times in scientific texts, 11 times in news, 16 times in essays, 37 times in fiction, and 15 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 91 times, making it the 701st most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[5]

References edit

  1. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “moment”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)
  2. ^ Stanisław Dubisz, editor (2003), “moment”, in Uniwersalny słownik języka polskiego [Universal dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1-4, Warsaw: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN SA, →ISBN
  3. ^ Witold Doroszewski, editor (1958–1969), “moment”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), Warszawa: PWN
  4. ^ moment”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  5. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “moment”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 253

Further reading edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French moment, from Latin momentum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment n (plural momente)

  1. moment (brief period of time) (clarification of this definition is needed)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

See also edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin momentum.

Noun edit

moment n

  1. a step in a process
    Nästa moment blir att föra in stavarna i kärnreaktorn
    The next step will be to insert the rods into the nuclear reactor
    ett kritiskt moment
    a critical step
    hinderbanans armgångsmoment
    the monkey bars section of the obstacle course (the monkey bars step in the process of getting through the obstacle course)
  2. an independent part of some (abstract) whole; an element, a factor
  3. (physics) moment

Declension edit

Declension of moment 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative moment momentet moment momenten
Genitive moments momentets moments momentens

Derived terms edit

References edit

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

moment m (plural momentau)

  1. (physics) moment

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
moment foment unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.