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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dormiēns, present participle of dormiō (I sleep).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dormant (not comparable)

  1. Inactive, sleeping, asleep, suspended.
    Grass goes dormant during the winter, waiting for spring before it grows again.
    The bank account was dormant; there had been no transactions in months.
    This volcano is dormant but not extinct.
    • 1777, Burke, Edmund, A Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol, on the Affairs of America; republished in The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, volume 2, 1864, page 10:
      It is by lying dormant a long time, or being at first very rarely exercised, that arbitrary power steals upon a people.
  2. (heraldry) In a sleeping posture; distinguished from couchant.
    a lion dormant
  3. (architecture) Leaning.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

dormant (plural dormants)

  1. (architecture) A crossbeam or joist.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dormant (feminine singular dormante, masculine plural dormants, feminine plural dormantes)

  1. dormant
  2. asleep

VerbEdit

dormant

  1. present participle of dormir

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

VerbEdit

dormant

  1. present participle of dormi