See also: dôter

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

dote +‎ -er

NounEdit

doter (plural doters)

  1. One who dotes; a person whose understanding is enfeebled by age; a dotard.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dōtāre, present active infinitive of dōtō. Doublet of douer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

doter

  1. (transitive) to endow, donate
  2. (transitive) to fund
    L'école accueille 170 élèves dans des salles propres, mais pauvrement dotées.
    The school welcomes 170 pupils to its clean, but poorly funded classrooms.

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dōter

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of dōtō

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dubitō.

VerbEdit

doter

  1. to doubt
  2. to fear; to be afraid (of)
    • 13th century, Unknown, La Vie de Saint Laurent, page 11, column 1, line 19:
      Saint Lorenz dit torment ne dot
      Saint Laurence says he doesn't fear torture

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: doubt
  • French: douter

ReferencesEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dóttir, from Proto-Norse ᛞᛟᚺᛏᚱᛁᛉ (dohtriz, daughters), from Proto-Germanic *duhtēr, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰugh₂tḗr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doter f (definite dotra, plural doter or dötter)

  1. Daughter.

Derived termsEdit