See also: doté

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English doten, from Middle Low German doten (to be foolish) or Middle Dutch doten (to be silly). Doublet of doit (Scottish English).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dote (third-person singular simple present dotes, present participle doting, simple past and past participle doted)

  1. (intransitive, usually with on) To be weakly or foolishly fond of somebody.
    Synonyms: adore, love
    Little Bill's parents just keep doting on him.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To act in a foolish manner; to be senile.
    • 1697, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      Time has made you dote, and vainly tell / Of arms imagined in your lonely cell.
    • 1698, Robert South, Twelve Sermons upon Several Subjects and Occasions:
      , "Ill-disposed Affections [] "
      He survived the use of his reason, grew infatuated, and doted long before he died.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

dote (plural dotes)

  1. (Ireland) A darling, a cutie.
    • 1922, Joyce, James, Ulysses, episode 13:
      But to be sure baby was as good as gold, a perfect little dote in his new fancy bib.
  2. (obsolete) An imbecile; a dotard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of doter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of doter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of doter
  5. second-person singular imperative of doter

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dōs, dotem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dote f (plural doti)

  1. (law) dowry, dower
  2. gift (2), talent (3)

LatinEdit

NounEdit

dōte

  1. ablative singular of dōs

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A back-formation from doten.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dote

  1. An idiot or imbecile; a dotard.
  2. A senile individual; an elderly person lacking sound mind.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: dote
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

dote

  1. Alternative form of doten

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dos

NounEdit

dote m (plural dotes)

  1. foundation (legacy constituting a permanent fund of a charity)
  2. dowry (property or payment given at time of marriage)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dōs (genitive singular dōtis). Doublet of dosis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dote f (plural dotes)

  1. dowry
  2. talent

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

dote

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dotar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dotar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of dotar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dotar.

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

dote

  1. plural of dota