EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English douce, from Old French dolz, dous, Middle French doux, douce, from Latin dulcis (sweet).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

douce (comparative more douce, superlative most douce)

  1. (obsolete) Sweet; nice; pleasant.
  2. (dialect) Serious and quiet; steady, not flighty or casual; sober.
    • 1918, Christopher Morley, The Haunted Bookshop, Grosset & Dunlap, 1919, p. 242:
      The bookseller, douce man, had seen too many eccentric customers to be shocked by the vehemence of his questioner.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 27:
      what would you say of a man with plenty of silver that bided all by his lone and made his own bed and did his own baking when he might have had a wife to make him douce and brave?
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p. 145:
      If Fabre, for example, were elected to the Academy tomorrow, you would see his lust for social revolution turning overnight into the most douce and debonair conformity.
    • 1996, Alasdair Gray, ‘The Story of a Recluse’, Canongate 2012 (Every Short Story 1951-2012), p. 271:
      So what strong lord of misrule can preside in this douce, commercially respectable, late 19th century city where even religious fanaticism reinforces un adventurous mediocrity?

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dus/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -us

AdjectiveEdit

douce

  1. feminine singular of doux

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dolz, douz, douce, from Latin dulcis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

douce

  1. Pleasant, sweet, nice, kind.
  2. Sweet to the taste.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: douce
  • Scots: douce

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

douce

  1. (rare) A lover.

ReferencesEdit