serious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English seryows, from Old French serieux, from Medieval Latin sēriōsus, an extension of Latin sērius ‎(grave, earnest, serious), from Proto-Indo-European *swēr- ‎(heavy). Cognate with German schwer ‎(heavy, difficult, severe), Old English swǣr ‎(heavy, grave, grievous). More at swear, sweer.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

serious ‎(comparative seriouser or more serious, superlative seriousest or most serious)

  1. Without humor or expression of happiness; grave in manner or disposition; earnest; thoughtful; solemn.
    It was a surprise to see the captain, who had always seemed so serious, laugh so heartily.
  2. Important; weighty; not trifling; leaving no room for play; needing great attention; critical.
    This is a serious problem. We'll need our best experts.
  3. Really intending what is said; being in earnest; not jesting or deceiving; meaningful.
    After all these years, we're finally getting serious attention.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: access · ways · grave · #952: serious · possession · move · foreign
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