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See also: Douse

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish dunsa (to plumb down, fall clumsily), Danish dunse (to thump). Compare Old English dwǣscan (to extinguish) and douse below.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

douse (third-person singular simple present douses, present participle dousing, simple past and past participle doused)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To plunge suddenly into water; to duck; to immerse.
  2. (intransitive) To fall suddenly into water.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)
  3. (transitive) To put out; to extinguish.
    • 1999, Arthur D. Jacobs, The Prison Called Hohenasperg
      The man who doused the fire was told to put the remainder of the coal into the bucket and then give the bucket to the soldier.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

douse (plural douses)

  1. A sudden plunging into water.
    • 1911, Cyphers Series on Practical Poultry Keeping (issue 1, page 74)
      In winter a douse in cold water helps the looks and adds to the style of the carcass, but they should be thoroughly dried before packing.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English duschen, dusshen (to rush, fall), related to Norwegian dusa (to break, cast down from), Old Dutch doesen (to beat, strike), German dialectal tusen, dusen (to strike, run against, collide), Saterland Frisian dössen (to strike). Compare doss, dust.

VerbEdit

douse (third-person singular simple present douses, present participle dousing, simple past and past participle doused)

  1. (transitive) To strike.
  2. (transitive, nautical) To strike or lower in haste; to slacken suddenly
    Douse the topsail!
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

douse (plural douses)

  1. A blow; stroke.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

douse

  1. Alternative form of douce