dower

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dowere, from Old French doeire, from Medieval Latin dōtārium, from Latin dōs, dōtis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dower (plural dowers)

  1. (law) The part of or interest in a deceased husband's property provided to his widow, usually in the form of a life estate.
  2. (law) Property given by a groom directly to his bride at or before their wedding in order to legitimize the marriage.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 1
      [] how features are abroad, / I am skill-less of; but, by my modesty,— / The jewel in my dower,—I would not wish / Any companion in the world but you []
  3. (obsolete) That with which one is gifted or endowed; endowment; gift.
    • Sir J. Davies
      How great, how plentiful, how rich a dower!
    • Wordsworth
      Man in his primeval dower arrayed.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

dower (third-person singular simple present dowers, present participle dowering, simple past and past participle dowered)

  1. To give a dower or dowry.
  2. To endow.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 08:55