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See also: Talent

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English talent, from Old English talente, borrowed from the plural of Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent). Compare Old High German talenta (talent). Later senses from Old French talent (a talent, also will, inclination, desire).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talent (plural talents)

  1. A marked natural ability or skill. [from 15thc.]
    He has a real talent for drawing.
  2. (historical) A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East. [from 9thc.]
    • 1611, Authorized Version, Matthew XXV 14-15:
      For the kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods. And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.
  3. (obsolete) A desire or inclination for something. [14th-16thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xx, in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      But my hede said sir Palomydes I wille not ryde these thre dayes / [] / Truly said sir Lamorak / and I wille abyde here with you / And whan ye ryde / thenne wille I ryde / [] / therfor I pray you syr Dynadan abyde and ryde with vs / Feythfully said Dynadan I wylle not abyde for I haue suche a talent to see sir Tristram that I may not abyde longe from hym
  4. (business, media, sports) People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person. [from 19thc.]
    The director searched their talent pool to fill the new opening.
  5. (slang) The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness. [from 20thc.]
    Not much talent in this bar tonight—let's hit the clubs.
    • 2011, Nic Venter, Wow! What a Life! (page 179)
      I went down to the beach front, of course, for that was the first thing that all Vaalies did: to look at the sea and to check the talent on the beach.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

talent m (plural talents)

  1. talent (Greek money)
  2. talent (skill)

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

NounEdit

talent m

  1. talent (unit of weight)
  2. talent (actual or potential ability)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • talent in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • talent in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from German Talent (talent), from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

NounEdit

talent n (singular definite talentet, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (potential or factual ability to perform a skill better than most people)
InflectionEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

NounEdit

talent c (singular definite talenten, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (unit of weight and money)
InflectionEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch talent, from Old French talent, from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, a particular weight, balance), from Proto-Indo-European *tl̥h₂ent-, from *telh₂-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talent n (plural talenten, diminutive talentje n)

  1. talent (gift, quality, capability)
  2. (historical) talent (ancient weight, value of money or coin)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talent m (plural talents)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece) a talent (an obsolete unit of weight or money)
  2. a talent, a gift, a knack

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin talentum.

NounEdit

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent or talenter, definite plural talenta or talentene)

  1. (a) talent

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin talentum

NounEdit

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent, definite plural talenta)

  1. (a) talent

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

NounEdit

talent m (oblique plural talenz or talentz, nominative singular talenz or talentz, nominative plural talent)

  1. desire; wish (to do something)

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

talent m inan

  1. talent, gift
  2. (historical) talent (ancient unit of weight and money)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

talent m pers

  1. (metonymically) talented person

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tǎlent/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lent

NounEdit

tàlent m (Cyrillic spelling та̀лент)

  1. talent

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

talent

  1. (literary) third-person plural imperfect / conditional of talu

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
talent dalent nhalent thalent
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.