downward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

down +‎ -ward

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdaʊnwɚd/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdaʊnwəd/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

downward (comparative more downward, superlative most downward)

  1. Toward a lower level, whether in physical space, in a hierarchy, or in amount or value.
    His position in society moved ever downward.
    The natural disasters put downward pressure on the creditworthiness of the nation’s insurance groups.
  2. At a lower level.
  3. southward
    • 1927, Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex[1], volume 2:
      If we turn to the New World, we find that among the American Indians, from the Eskimo of Alaska downward to Brazil and still farther south, homosexual customs have been very frequently observed.

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AdjectiveEdit

downward (comparative more downward, superlative most downward)

  1. Moving, sloping or oriented downward.
    He spoke with a downward glance.
  2. Located at a lower level.

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