See also: dun't

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • dun't (As a contraction)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dunt, dynt, from Old English dynt ‎(dint, blow, strike, stroke, bruise, stripe, thud, the mark or noise of a blow, a bruise, noise, crash), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz ‎(shock, blow), from Proto-Indo-European *dhen- ‎(to beat, push). Cognate with Swedish dialectal dunt ‎(stroke).

NounEdit

dunt ‎(plural dunts)

  1. (Scotland) A stroke; a dull-sounding blow

VerbEdit

dunt ‎(third-person singular simple present dunts, present participle dunting, simple past and past participle dunted)

  1. (Scotland) To strike; give a blow to; knock.

ContractionEdit

dunt

  1. (Yorkshire) Eye dialect spelling of don't.

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2nd edition 1989

DutchEdit

Old FrenchEdit

PrepositionEdit

dunt

  1. of; of which; of whom
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 94 (of the Champion Classiques edition, ISBN 2-7453-0520-4), line 853:
      mais de l'el dunt vos oi parler
      but of the thing I hear you speak of

Usage notesEdit

  • Like French dont, may be translated by of whom when it refers to a person and of which when it does not.

DescendantsEdit

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