See also: undé and -unde

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse unna, from Proto-Germanic *unnaną, cognate with Norwegian unne, Swedish unna, German gönnen. Related to the Danish words yndig, ynde, gunst.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

unde (past tense undte, past participle undt)

  1. (transitive) to wish, grant, not grudge (to find joy in a fortune enjoyed by another; to feel that another has deserved something)
    • 2011, Sara Blædel, Kald mig prinsesse, Art People, →ISBN:
      Under jeg hende ikke at blive lykkelig? tænkte hun.
      Do I begrudge her happiness?
    • 2017, Diana Benneweis, Alting har sin pris, Lindhardt og Ringhof, →ISBN:
      Jeg er sikker på og glad for, at Ilse fik en oplevelse for livet. Det under jeg hende.
      I am sure and glad that Ilse had the experience of her life. I think she deserved it.
    • 2000, En lykkelig kvinde: roman, Gyldendal A/S, →ISBN, page 11:
      Min kollega Miriam trænger til aflastning og det under jeg hende fuldt ud.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1837, Hans Christian Andersen, Improvisatoren: original roman i to dele, page 214:
      Det var daarligt gjort!' svarede han og loe, nei, da under jeg hende en bedre Mand, end mig.'
      That was ill done! he replied and laughed, no, then I wish her a better man/husband than me.
    • 2017, Marie Louise Fischer, Tvillingerne, Lindhardt og Ringhof, →ISBN:
      Den triumf under jeg hende ikke.
      I find no joy in her triumph.
  2. (obsolete) to like, to love
    • 1862, Danmarks gamle folkeviser, page 25:
      Valdemar lader Tove kalde, byder hende sidde hos og spørger hende, hvor vel hun under Sofie, hvortil Тove svarer: Saa vel under jeg hende som min egen Søn Кristoffer; jeg vil give hende Gangeren graa og Dronningenavnet oven i Кjøbet.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 2016, Thit Jensen, Jørgen Lykke: bind 2, Lindhardt og Ringhof, →ISBN:
      »Da under jeg hende bedre end Albrecht Skeel.«
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

For cunde, from a declined form of quī (which, what, where) and a demonstrative suffix *-de. See ubi for the loss of c and compare ali-cunde and sī-cunde.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

unde (not comparable)

  1. whence, from where
    • 65 BCE – 8 BCE, Horace, Sermones 1.9.60-63:
      Ecce Fuscus Aristius occurrit[..]Cōnsistimus. “Unde venīs?” et “quō tendis?” rogat et respondet.
      There's Aristius Fuscus coming up[..]We stop. “Where have you been? Where are you headed?” he asks and answers.

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Asturian: onde
  • Catalan: on
  • Dalmatian: du andú
  • Franco-Provençal: onte, dont
  • French: dont
  • Galician: onde
  • Italian: onde
  • Megleno-Romanian: iundi
  • Occitan: ont
  • Old French: ont
  • Portuguese: onde
  • Romanian: unde
  • Sardinian: abundi
  • Sicilian: unni
  • Spanish: donde, onde
  • Venetian: ónde

See also edit

References edit

  • unde”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • unde”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • unde in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • it follows from this that..: ex quo, unde, hinc efficitur ut
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed redeat, unde aberravit oratio
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed ad id, unde digressi sumus, revertamur
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: verum ut ad id, unde digressa est oratio, revertamur
    • I have no means, no livelihood: non habeo, qui (unde) vivam

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French und, from Latin unda.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

unde (plural undes)

  1. (rare) wave

Descendants edit

References edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin unda.

Noun edit

unde oblique singularf (oblique plural undes, nominative singular unde, nominative plural undes)

  1. wave (motion of a liquid)

Descendants edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin unde. Cognate with Sardinian unde and Sicilian unni.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈun.de]
  • (file)

Adverb edit

unde

  1. where
    Unde ai fost ieri?
    Where were you yesterday?

Derived terms edit

Sardinian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin unde.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈunde/, [ˈuɳ.ɖɛ]

Conjunction edit

unde

  1. where
    Synonym: ue

Adverb edit

unde

  1. (interrogative) where, whereabouts

Related terms edit