See also: don't and dönt

EnglishEdit

ContractionEdit

dont

  1. Misspelling of don't.

BretonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

A suppletive verb. The verbal noun is from Middle Breton donet (influenced by monet (to go)), from Old Breton diminet. Cognate with Welsh dyfod, dod, and Cornish dos, dones; from Old Breton di, do + monet (to go). The other forms are from Proto-Celtic *toageti, itself also a suppletive verb (stemming from *ageti (to drive) and *pelh₂-). See also Old Irish do·aig (to drive off).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dont

  1. (intransitive) to come

InflectionEdit

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

dont

  1. a (piece of) work, a deed

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French dont, from Old French dunt, from Vulgar Latin/Latin unde (from where)[1]. Compare Spanish donde (where).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dont

  1. of/from whom/which, whose
    Vous rappelez-vous ce dont je vous ai parlé ?
    Do you remember that of which we spoke?
    Il n’est rien dont je sois encore certain.
    It is nothing of which I am still certain.
    Quel est le pays dont provient cette marchandise suspecte ?
    What is the country from which the suspicious merchandise comes?
    J’ai décidé d’abandonner l’affaire dont je vous ai entretenu il y a quelques jours.
    I decided to abandon the matter of which we have been speaking for a few days.
    La maladie dont il est mort porte un nom imprononçable.
    The disease of which he died has an unpronounceable name.
    Les pays dont nous n’avons point de connaissance sont les destinations privilégiées des grands aventuriers.
    The countries of which we have little knowledge are the privileged destinations of great adventurers.
    Ces étoiles — dont le nom m’échappe — sont les plus brillantes de la voûte céleste.
    These stars, whose names escape me, are the brightest in the skies.
  2. (sometimes) by which
    Le coup dont il fut frappé.
    The blow by which he was struck.
  3. Denotes a part of a set, may be translated as "including" or such as in some situations.
    Il a eu dix enfants, dont neuf filles.
    He had ten children, nine of them girls.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964) Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dont

  1. Alternative form of dint

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

dont

  1. of whom; of which

DescendantsEdit

  • French: dont

OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

PrepositionEdit

dont

  1. including, such as
    • 2019 October 31, “Los Estats Units an reconegut lo genodici armèni”, in Jornalet[1]:
      A l'ora d'ara, son de desenas d’estats qu’an reconegut lo genocidi armèni, dont l’estat francés.
      Currently, there are dozens of states that have recognized the Armenian genocide, including the French state.