See also: 'eard

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *ard, from Proto-Germanic *ardiz, *arduz, *arþuz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erh₃- (to plough).

Cognate with Old Saxon ard, Old High German art (German Art). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin arō, Ancient Greek ἀρόω (aróō), Old East Slavic орати (orati), Russian ора́ть (orátʹ).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /æ͜ɑrd/, [æ͜ɑrˠd]

NounEdit

eard m (nominative plural eardas)

  1. homeland, native soil; one's home, a dwelling
    Ðis is mīn āgen ēþel, eard, and land
    This is my own country, home and land.
  2. earth, land
  3. state; station; condition; fate

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: art
    • Scots: airt
  • Middle English: erd, ard, arde, urde

YolaEdit

NounEdit

eard

  1. Alternative form of erth

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 38