AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin aetas. Compare also Albanian jetë.

NounEdit

ete f (plural eti)

  1. an age, long period of time
  2. (figuratively) life

SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ete f pl

  1. plural of etã

ChuukeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

e- +‎ -te

PronounEdit

ete

  1. he, she, it will never
  2. so one does not

Related termsEdit

Present and past tense Negative tense Future Negative future Distant future Negative determinate
Singular First person ua use upwe usap upwap ute
Second person ka, ke kose, kese kopwe, kepwe kosap, kesap kopwap, kepwap kote, kete
Third person a ese epwe esap epwap ete
Plural First person aua (exclusive)
sia (inclusive)
ause (exclusive)
sise (inclusive)
aupwe (exclusive)
sipwe (inclusive)
ausap (exclusive)
sisap (inclusive)
aupwap (exclusive)
sipwap (inclusive)
aute (exclusive)
site (inclusive)
Second person oua ouse oupwe ousap oupwap oute
Third person ra, re rese repwe resap repwap rete



DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ete

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of eten

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

ete

  1. slightly

Related termsEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

ete

  1. genitive plural of esi

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin aetās, aetātem. Cf. Italian età.

NounEdit

ete f (plural etes)

  1. epoch, time

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


Khumi ChinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ete

  1. (transitive) to plant, cultivate

ReferencesEdit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 48

MobilianEdit

NounEdit

ete

  1. wood

ReferencesEdit

  • Emanuel J. Drechsel, Mobilian jargon: linguistic and sociohistorical aspects of a Native American pidgin (1997), page 116

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French esté, from Latin aestās, aestātem.

NounEdit

ete m (plural etes)

  1. (Sark) summer

See alsoEdit

Seasons in Norman · les saisouns (layout · text)
spring
France: renouvé (spring)
Guernsey: r'nouvé (spring)
Jersey: èrnouvé (spring)
Sark: rnuve (spring)
summer
France: étaé, éto (summer)
Guernsey: étaï (summer)
Jersey: êté (summer)
Sark: ete (summer)
autumn
France: arryire (autumn)
Guernsey: autaomme (autumn)
Jersey: s'tembre (autumn)
Sark: otum (autumn)
winter
France: hivé (winter)
Guernsey: hivaer (winter)
Jersey: hivé (winter)
Sark: ive (winter)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eta, from Proto-Germanic *etaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ete (imperative et, present tense eter, passive etes, simple past åt, past participle ett, present participle etende)

  1. to eat
    et, drikk og vær gladeat, drink and be merry

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

ete (present tense et, past tense åt, past participle ete, passive infinitive etast, present participle etande, imperative et)

  1. Alternative form of eta

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ete

  1. nominative/accusative plural masculine of eta (“this”)

PronounEdit

ete m

  1. nominative/accusative plural of eta (“this one”)

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

ete

  1. dative singular of et

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From northern Middle English art.

NounEdit

ete

  1. quarter of a compass

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN