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See also: Erd, ERD, and -erd

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English erd (native land or region; homeland, abode; dwelling or home.) From Old English eard (native place, country, region, dwelling-place, estate, cultivated ground, earth, land)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

erd

  1. (dialect, rare) Alternative form of earth
    • 1887, John Miller Dow Meiklejohn, A Brief History of the English Language and Literature, Vol. 2 (of 2)[1]:
      Thi will on erd be wrought, eek as it is wrought in heven ay.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

erd

  1. Native land, homeland, home

Northern KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

According to Justi from Arabic أَرْض (ʾarḍ), from Proto-Semitic *ʾarṣ́-. Though Ačaryan denies this and claims derivation from Armenian արտ (art, arable land).

NounEdit

erd

  1. ground, earth

ReferencesEdit

  • Jaba, Auguste; Justi, Ferdinand (1879) Dictionnaire Kurde-Français [Kurdish–French Dictionary], Saint Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences
  • Ačaṙean, Hračʿeay (1971–1979), “արտ”, in Hayerēn armatakan baṙaran [Dictionary of Armenian Root Words] (in Armenian), 2nd edition, Yerevan: University Press

ZazakiEdit

 
Zazaki Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia diq
 
Zazaki Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia diq

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Arabic ارض (arḍ).

NounEdit

erd m

  1. earth, soil, ground, homeland
    Synonyms: grond, bodem
  2. (electricity) earth, ground