See also: -ees and ees-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ees

  1. (rare) plural of e, the name of the letter E.
    • 1856, Goold Brown, The First Lines of English Grammar, page 10:
      These names [] may form regular plurals; thus, Aes, Bees, Cees, Dees, Ees, Effs, Gees, Aitches, Ies, Jays, Kays, Ells, Ems, Ens, Oes, Pees, Kues, Ars, Esses, Tees, Ues, Vees, Double-ues, Exes, Wies, Zees.
    • 1998, Ricardo Corona, "These Esses" ("Esses esses"), in Other Shores (Outras Praias), translated by Ricardo Corona & Charles Perrone
      to say (full of ees, ies, ues) that plurals are always two or more
    • 2005, David Riede, Allegories of One's Own Mind: Melancholy in Victorian Poetry, p. 51
      The verse is further slowed by the heavy punctuation of the refrain and by the long vowel sounds—not only the "hollow oes and aes" but especially the interminable "ees" of "dreary . . . aweary, aweary."

Etymology 2Edit

Pronunciation spelling of is, representing Latino- or French-accented English.

VerbEdit

ees

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative spelling of is

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

ees

  1. plural of ee

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *ede. Cognates include Finnish esi- and Hungarian előtt.

PostpositionEdit

ees

  1. before, in front of

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈeːs/, [ˈe̞ːs̠]
  • Rhymes: -eːs
  • Syllabification(key): ees

AdverbEdit

ees

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of edes.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


IngrianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Spacial inflection of ees
→○ illative ettee
inessive ees
○→ elative eest

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ees

  1. (of location) in front

NounEdit

ees

  1. inessive singular of esi

Etymology 2Edit

Lative singular of esi (front)

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ees

  1. even
    • 1936, D. I. Efimov, Lukukirja: Inkeroisia alkușkouluja vart (ensimäine osa), Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 6:
      Kaik väki jo on töös.
      Lapsiil omat hoolet on ees.
      All the people are already working.
      Even children have their own concerns.

ReferencesEdit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 38