See also: See, SEE, sée, and seë

English Edit

Pronunciation Edit

Etymology 1 Edit

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon (to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know), from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan, from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to see, notice).

Verb Edit

see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seeing, simple past saw or (dialectal) seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed, past participle seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed or (dialectal) saw)

  1. (transitive) To perceive or detect someone or something with the eyes, or as if by sight.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter I, in Mr. Pratt's Patients, page 18:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path. [] It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      But Richmond [] appeared to lose himself in his own reflections. Some pickled crab, which he had not touched, had been removed with a damson pie; and his sister saw [] that he had eaten no more than a spoonful of that either.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      I want to see this house!
      (file)
    1. To witness or observe by personal experience.
      Hyponyms: experience, suffer
      Now I've seen it all!
      I have been blind since birth and I love to read Braille. When the books arrive in from the library, I can’t wait to see what stories they have sent me.
    2. To watch (a movie) at a cinema, or a show on television etc.
      I saw the latest Tarantino flick last week.
  2. To form a mental picture of.
    • 2013 August 23, Mark Cocker, “Wings of Desire”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 11, page 28:
      It is not just that we see birds as little versions of ourselves. It is also that, at the same time, they stand outside any moral process. They are utterly indifferent. This absolute oblivion on their part, this lack of sharing, is powerful.
    • 2014 October 14, David Malcolm, “The Great War Re-Remembered: Allohistory and Allohistorical Fiction”, in Martin Löschnigg, Marzena Sokolowska-Paryz, editors, The Great War in Post-Memory Literature and Film[1], Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG., →ISBN, page 173:
      The question of the plausibility of the counter-factual is seen as key in all three discussions of allohistorical fiction (as it is in Demandt's and Ferguson's examinations of allohistory) (cf. Rodiek 25–26; Ritter 15–16; Helbig 32).
    1. (figurative) To understand.
      Do you see what I mean?
      • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
        Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic [] . Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. [] But the scandals kept coming [] . A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul.
    2. To come to a realization of having been mistaken or misled.
      They're blind to the damage they do, but someday they'll see.
    3. (transitive) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.
      The oracle saw the destruction of the city.
      • 1967, Alan Gordon, Garry Bonner (lyrics and music), “Happy Together”, performed by The Turtles:
        I can't see me lovin' nobody but you / For all my life / When you're with me, baby the skies'll be blue / For all my life
    4. (used in the imperative) Used to emphasise a proposition.
      You see, Johnny, your Dad isn't your real father.
      You're not welcome here any more, see?
  3. (social) To meet, to visit.
    1. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.
      to go to see a friend
    2. To date frequently.
      I've been seeing her for two months.
      • 2022 September 9, Dan Shive, El Goonish Shive (webcomic), Comic for Friday, Sep 9, 2022:
        "You're... remarrying? I didn't even know you were seeing someone. And she's going to live here?"
    3. To visit for a medical appointment.
      You should see a doctor about that rash on your arm.
      I've been seeing a therapist for three years now.
  4. (ergative) To be the setting or time of.
    The 20th century saw humanity's first space exploration.
    1999 saw the release of many great films.
    • 1995 June 3, David Sprague, “Buffalo Tom Reaches Crossroads: EastWest Trio At Make-Or-Break Point”, in Billboard, volume 107, number 22, page 9:
      It seems as if every passing year sees the mainstream embrace a longtime cult-favorite alternative rock band.
  5. (by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.
    I'll see you hang for this!  I saw that they didn't make any more trouble.
  6. (transitive) To wait upon; attend, escort.
    I saw the old lady safely across the road.
    You can see yourself out.
  7. (gambling, transitive) To respond to another player's bet with a bet of equal value.
    I'll see your twenty dollars and raise you ten.
  8. To determine by trial or experiment; to find out (if or whether).
    I'll come over later and see if I can fix your computer.
    You think I can't beat you in a race, eh? We'll see.
  9. (used in the imperative) To reference or to study for further details.
    Step 4: In the system, check out the laptop to the student (see: "Logging Resources" in the Tutor Manual).
    For a complete proof of the Poincaré conjecture, see Appendix C.
  10. To examine something closely, or to utilize something, often as a temporary alternative.
    Can I see that lighter for a second? Mine just quit working.
  11. To include as one of something's experiences.
    The equipment has not seen usage outside of our projects.
    I saw military service in Vietnam.
Conjugation Edit
Synonyms Edit
Derived terms Edit
Translations Edit

Interjection Edit

see

  1. Introducing an explanation
    Synonyms: look, well, so
    See, in order to win the full prize we would have to come up with a scheme to land a rover on the Moon.
Translations Edit

See also Edit

Etymology 2 Edit

From Middle English se, see, from Old French sie (seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see), from Latin sedes (seat), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (to sit).

Noun Edit

see (plural sees)

  1. a diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
Derived terms Edit
Related terms Edit
Translations Edit

See also Edit

Etymology 3 Edit

Noun Edit

see (plural sees)

  1. Alternative form of cee; the name of the Latin-script letter C.
    • 1881 April, J. B. Rundell, “The Irregularities of English Spelling: what they Cost and what they are Worth”, in The Spelling Reformer, and Journal of the English Spelling Reform Association, volume I, number 10, London, page 147:
      see, ar, eye, ee, ess, cries
    • 1984, Eva Holmquist, No Certain Time, Libra Publishers, →ISBN, page 17:
      They were still shocked if you said “eff you see kay” out loud, though it didn’t stop any of them from doing it.
    • 1996, Sycamore Review, volume 8, page 116:
      eff you see kay why oh you.
    • 2009, Eric Barnes, Shimmer, Denver, Colo.: Unbridled Books, →ISBN, page 91:
      I hear you. But hear me out, all right? Because I mean what I’m about to say. Eff-you-see-kay-why-oh-you. Fuck you.
    • 2020, Paul Richardson, Taylah’s Got Talent, →ISBN:
      Her mother said, “Maybe you can have ‘Muck Donnas’, or we could have fish and chips.” Krissy shook her head, “Nah. We no have fwishenchit. We have Kay Eff See nuggers?”
    • 2023, Callum McSorley, chapter 15, in Squeaky Clean, Pushkin Press, →ISBN:
      Same old answer: the eff-you-see-kay-you-pee.
Derived terms Edit

Further reading Edit

Anagrams Edit

Afrikaans Edit

Alternative forms Edit

Etymology Edit

From Dutch zee, from Middle Dutch sêe, from Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

see (plural seë)

  1. sea
    Laasweek het ons see toe gegaan.
    Last week we went to the sea.
    Die trekvoëls vlieg oor die berge, oor die see, Lapland toe.
    The migratory birds are flying over the mountains, over the sea, to Sápmi.

Derived terms Edit

Estonian Edit

Etymology Edit

From Proto-Finnic *se, ultimately from Proto-Uralic *śe. cognate to Finnish se, Votic se, Erzya се (śe, this, that), Khanty си (si, that over yonder; now, then), and Nganasan [script needed] (sete, he, she).

Pronoun Edit

see (genitive selle, partitive seda)

  1. this
  2. it
  3. (colloquial, somewhat rude) he, she (usually only used when said person is not present)

Declension Edit

Derived terms Edit

See also Edit

Finnish Edit

Pronunciation Edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː/, [ˈs̠e̞ː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Syllabification(key): see

Etymology 1 Edit

Compare Swedish ce, English cee, both ultimately from Latin with the c sound changed from a /k/ to a /s/ as is a common change in languages using the Latin alphabet.

Alternative forms Edit

Noun Edit

see

  1. cee (The name of the Latin-script letter C)
    • 1990, Eila Hämäläinen, Aletaan I: Suomen kielen oppikirja vasta-alkajille (Let's begin I: Finnish textbook for the beginners), Helsinki: Helsingin Yliopisto (University of Helsinki), →ISBN, page 23:
      Luemme kirjaimet näin: aa bee see dee ee äf gee hoo ii jii koo äl äm än oo pee kuu är äs tee uu vee kaksois-vee äks yy tset ruotsalainen oo ää öö
      We read the letters as follows: aa bee see …
Usage notes Edit
  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of c-kirjain (letter C, letter c) instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural. The plural forms may get confused with sei (saithe).
Declension Edit
Inflection of see (Kotus type 18/maa, no gradation)
nominative see seet
genitive seen seiden
seitten
partitive seetä seitä
illative seehen seihin
singular plural
nominative see seet
accusative nom. see seet
gen. seen
genitive seen seiden
seitten
partitive seetä seitä
inessive seessä seissä
elative seestä seistä
illative seehen seihin
adessive seellä seillä
ablative seeltä seiltä
allative seelle seille
essive seenä seinä
translative seeksi seiksi
instructive sein
abessive seettä seittä
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of see (type maa)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative seeni seeni
accusative nom. seeni seeni
gen. seeni
genitive seeni seideni
seitteni
partitive seetäni seitäni
inessive seessäni seissäni
elative seestäni seistäni
illative seeheni seihini
adessive seelläni seilläni
ablative seeltäni seiltäni
allative seelleni seilleni
essive seenäni seinäni
translative seekseni seikseni
instructive
abessive seettäni seittäni
comitative seineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative seesi seesi
accusative nom. seesi seesi
gen. seesi
genitive seesi seidesi
seittesi
partitive seetäsi seitäsi
inessive seessäsi seissäsi
elative seestäsi seistäsi
illative seehesi seihisi
adessive seelläsi seilläsi
ablative seeltäsi seiltäsi
allative seellesi seillesi
essive seenäsi seinäsi
translative seeksesi seiksesi
instructive
abessive seettäsi seittäsi
comitative seinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative seemme seemme
accusative nom. seemme seemme
gen. seemme
genitive seemme seidemme
seittemme
partitive seetämme seitämme
inessive seessämme seissämme
elative seestämme seistämme
illative seehemme seihimme
adessive seellämme seillämme
ablative seeltämme seiltämme
allative seellemme seillemme
essive seenämme seinämme
translative seeksemme seiksemme
instructive
abessive seettämme seittämme
comitative seinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative seenne seenne
accusative nom. seenne seenne
gen. seenne
genitive seenne seidenne
seittenne
partitive seetänne seitänne
inessive seessänne seissänne
elative seestänne seistänne
illative seehenne seihinne
adessive seellänne seillänne
ablative seeltänne seiltänne
allative seellenne seillenne
essive seenänne seinänne
translative seeksenne seiksenne
instructive
abessive seettänne seittänne
comitative seinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative seensä seensä
accusative nom. seensä seensä
gen. seensä
genitive seensä seidensä
seittensä
partitive seetään
seetänsä
seitään
seitänsä
inessive seessään
seessänsä
seissään
seissänsä
elative seestään
seestänsä
seistään
seistänsä
illative seehensä seihinsä
adessive seellään
seellänsä
seillään
seillänsä
ablative seeltään
seeltänsä
seiltään
seiltänsä
allative seelleen
seellensä
seilleen
seillensä
essive seenään
seenänsä
seinään
seinänsä
translative seekseen
seeksensä
seikseen
seiksensä
instructive
abessive seettään
seettänsä
seittään
seittänsä
comitative seineen
seinensä
Synonyms Edit

Etymology 2 Edit

Finnish numbers (edit)
70[a], [b]
 ←  6 7 8  → 
    Cardinal: seitsemän
    Colloquial counting form: see
    Ordinal: seitsemäs
    Colloquial ordinal: seikki, seiska
    Ordinal abbreviation: 7., 7:s
    Digit name: seiska (informal), seitsikko, seitsemäinen
    Adverbial: seitsemästi
    Multiplier: seitsenkertainen
    Fractional: seitsemäsosa, seitsemännes

< seitsemän

Numeral Edit

see

  1. (colloquial, counting) seven

See also Edit

Etymology 3 Edit

Compare Estonian see.

Pronoun Edit

see

  1. (dialectal, rare, Southwest) Alternative form of se.

Anagrams Edit

Friulian Edit

Alternative forms Edit

Etymology Edit

From the verb seâ. Compare Italian sega, Venetian siega, French scie.

Noun Edit

see f (plural seis)

  1. saw

Ingrian Edit

Pronunciation Edit

Pronoun Edit

see

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of se
    • 1937, V. A. Tetjurev, translated by N. I. Molotsova, Loonnontiito (ensimäin osa): oppikirja alkușkoulun kolmatta klaassaa vart, Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-Pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 7:
      See näyttää, jot pintamaas ono mokomat osat, kummat pallaat.
      This shows that there are such parts in the topsoil that burn.

Determiner Edit

see

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of se

References Edit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 514

Middle Dutch Edit

Etymology Edit

From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Noun Edit

sêe f or m

  1. sea

Inflection Edit

Weak feminine
Singular Plural
Nominative sêe sêwen
Accusative sêe sêwen
Genitive sêwen sêwen
Dative sêe, sêwen sêwen

Descendants Edit

  • Dutch: zee f
    • Afrikaans: see
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: sei
    • Javindo: see
    • Negerhollands: see
    • Saramaccan:
    • Sranan Tongo: se
  • Limburgish: zieë f
  • West Flemish: zji m or f, zêe

Further reading Edit

Middle English Edit

Etymology 1 Edit

Inherited from Old English , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Alternative forms Edit

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

see (plural sees)

  1. sea, ocean
  2. A body of water, a lake
Related terms Edit
Descendants Edit
References Edit

Etymology 2 Edit

Borrowed from Old French sei, from Latin sedes.

Alternative forms Edit

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

see (plural sees)

  1. seat, chair
  2. dwelling, residence
  3. A royal or episcopal chair
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm
  5. A royal or episcopal residence
  6. (Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
Descendants Edit
References Edit

North Frisian Edit

Etymology Edit

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi. Cognates include Dutch zee.

Noun Edit

see m (plural seen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) lake

Scots Edit

Alternative forms Edit

Etymology Edit

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon, from Proto-West Germanic *sehwan. Cognate with English see.

Pronunciation Edit

Verb Edit

see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seein, simple past saw, seed, past participle seen)

  1. to see

References Edit

  1. ^ see, v.” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Tetum Edit

Verb Edit

see

  1. to turn, to present

Votic Edit

Alternative forms Edit

Etymology Edit

From Proto-Finnic *se, from Proto-Uralic *śe.

Pronunciation Edit

  • (Luutsa, Liivtšülä) IPA(key): /ˈseː/, [ˈseː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Hyphenation: see

Pronoun Edit

see

  1. (demonstrative) that
  2. (demonstrative) ít

Inflection Edit

Inflection of see
singular plural
nominative see need
nee
genitive sene neije
nedʹdʹe
accusative sene neije
nedʹdʹe
partitive sitä neite
illative sihe neise
inessive senez neiz
elative senesse neisse
allative sele
selle
neile
neille
adessive selle
sell
neille
neill
ablative selte neilte
translative senessi neissi
**) the terminative is formed by adding the suffix -ssaa to the short illative or the genitive.
***) the comitative is formed by adding the suffix -ka to the genitive.

West Frisian Edit

Etymology Edit

From Old Frisian , from Proto-West Germanic *saiwi.

Pronunciation Edit

Noun Edit

see c (plural seeën, diminutive seeke)

  1. sea

Derived terms Edit

Further reading Edit

  • see”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011