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See also: EFT and eft-

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English efeta, of unknown origin.

NounEdit

eft (plural efts)

  1. A newt, especially the European smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris, syn. Triturus punctatus).
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.10:
      Only these marishes and myrie bogs, / In which the fearefull ewftes do build their bowres, / Yeeld me an hostry mongst the croking frogs […].
    • 1844, Robert Browning, "Garden Fancies," II. Sibrandus Schafnaburgennis:
      How did he like it when the live creatures
      Tickled and toused and browsed him all over,
      And worm, slug, eft, with serious features
      Came in, each one, for his right of trover?
Usage notesEdit

The term red eft is used for the land-dwelling juvenile stage of the Eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens).

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English eft, from Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Compare after, aft.

AdverbEdit

eft (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Again; afterwards
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian eft, Old Saxon eft, Old Norse ept.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

eft

  1. a second time, again; afterwards

Old SaxonEdit

YolaEdit

NounEdit

eft

  1. newt

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)