EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English efeta, of unknown origin.

NounEdit

eft (plural efts)

  1. A newt, especially the European smooth newt (Triton punctatus).
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.10:
      Only these marishes and myrie bogs, / In which the fearefull ewftes do build their bowres, / Yeeld me an hostry mongst the croking frogs […].
Usage notesEdit

The term red eft is used for the land-dwelling juvenile stage of the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens).

Derived termsEdit
  • red eft
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English eft, from Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Compare after, aft.

AdverbEdit

eft (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) again; afterwards
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian eft, Old Saxon eft, Old Norse ept.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

eft

  1. a second time, again; afterwards

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aftiz. Cognate with Old Frisian eft, Old English eft, Old Norse ept.

AdverbEdit

eft

  1. afterwards, again
Last modified on 6 October 2013, at 17:39