See also: ef-, -ef, and EF

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ef (plural efs)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F.
    • 2004, Will Rogers, The Stonking Steps, page 170:
      I have drunk en-ee-cee-tee-ay-ar from the ef-ell-oh-doubleyou-ee-ar-ess in his gee-ay-ar-dee-ee-en many a time.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Conjunction edit

ef

  1. (nonstandard) Pronunciation spelling of if, representing dialectal English.
    • 1882, James Jackson, Tom Terror, the Outlaw[1]:
      Captain Tom would have hired him to hunt down his own child, ef Rosebud hadn’t interfered.

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ef n (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F.

Further reading edit

  • ef in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ef in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse ef, from Proto-Germanic *jabai.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

ef

  1. if

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch ef.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

èf

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F/f.

See also edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ef f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter F.

Usage notes edit

  • Multiple Latin names for the letter F, f have been suggested. The most common is ef or a syllabic f, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , əf, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιφφε (iphphe).

Coordinate terms edit

References edit

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

Latvian edit

Pronunciation edit

(file)

Noun edit

ef m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter F/f.

See also edit

Lower Sorbian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ef

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter f.

See also edit

Malay edit

Etymology edit

From English ef.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

éf (plural ef-ef)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F/f.

See also edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin apis.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ef oblique singularm (oblique plural es, nominative singular es, nominative plural ef)

  1. bee

Descendants edit

  • Picard: é

References edit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (ef)

Old Norse edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *jabai, originally the dative of *jabą (doubt), whence ef (doubt).

Conjunction edit

ef

  1. if
Descendants edit
  • Icelandic: ef
  • Old Swedish: ef, em, um
    • Swedish: om
    • Norwegian:
      • Norwegian Nynorsk: um (influenced by um < umb)
  • Old Danish: æf, æm, um
    • Danish: om
      • Norwegian Bokmål: om
        • Norwegian Nynorsk: om

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *jabą.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ef

  1. (obsolete) doubt
    mér er til efs
    I doubt
    (literally, “for me is at doubt”)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
  • iflaust (doubtless, undoubted)
Descendants edit

Old Saxon edit

Conjunction edit

ef

  1. if, when

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

From English ef, the English name of the letter F/f.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: ef
  • IPA(key): /ʔef/, [ʔɛf]
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔep/, [ˈʔɛp] (colloquial)
  • Rhymes: -ef

Noun edit

ef (Baybayin spelling ᜁᜉ᜔)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F/f, in the Filipino alphabet.
    Synonym: (in the Abecedario) efe

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • ef”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-European *éy.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ef

  1. (literary) he; him

Synonyms edit

  • e, o (colloquial)