aft

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English æftan ‎(behind); originally superlative of of ‎(off). See after.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aft ‎(uncountable)

  1. (nautical) The stern portion of a vessel.

AdverbEdit

aft ‎(comparative further aft or more aft, superlative furthest aft or most aft)

  1. (nautical) At, near, or towards the stern of a vessel (with the frame of reference within the vessel).

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aft ‎(comparative further aft or more aft, superlative furthest aft or most aft)

  1. located at the back of a boat, ship, or airplane

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *aweita, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewh₁- (compare Ancient Greek ἀῦτμη ‎(aûtmē) ‘breath’, Welsh awel ‘breeze’)[1].

NounEdit

aft m

  1. draft (wind, bellows)
  2. waft, whiff
  3. warmth from a fire

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.71

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aft f ‎(plural aften, diminutive aftje n)

  1. aphtha (a sore in the mucous membrane of the mouth).

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alteration of oft

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

aft

  1. Obsolete spelling of oft
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