See also: AFT

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English æftan(behind); originally superlative of of(off). See after.

NounEdit

aft ‎(usually uncountable, plural afts)

  1. (nautical) The stern portion of a vessel.

AdverbEdit

aft ‎(comparative further aft or more aft, superlative furthest aft or most aft)

  1. (nautical) At, near, or towards the stern of a vessel (with the frame of reference within the vessel).
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aft ‎(comparative further aft or more aft, superlative furthest aft or most aft)

  1. located at the back of a boat, ship, or airplane

Etymology 2Edit

A clipped form of afternoon.

NounEdit

aft ‎(plural afts)

  1. (dated slang) Alternative form of afternoon: the time of day from noon until early evening.
    • 1898, The Hotel/Motor Hotel Monthly, Vol. 6, p. 27:
      A gents' toilet room might be found in a house that caters for the cheaper class of theatrical patronage, where the slangy language of the "goin' to the mat this aft?" style prevails. A gents toilet room is not found in the Southern Hotel. It either "men's" or "gentlemen's".

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *aweita, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewh₁- (compare Ancient Greek ἀῦτμη(aûtmē) ‘breath’, Welsh awel ‘breeze’)[1].

NounEdit

aft m

  1. draft (wind, bellows)
  2. waft, whiff
  3. warmth from a fire

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.71

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aft f ‎(plural aften, diminutive aftje n)

  1. aphtha (a sore in the mucous membrane of the mouth).

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alteration of oft

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

aft

  1. Obsolete spelling of oft