elevated

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛləveɪtɪd/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: el‧e‧vated

VerbEdit

elevated

  1. simple past tense and past participle of elevate

AdjectiveEdit

elevated (comparative more elevated, superlative most elevated)

  1. Raised, particularly above ground level.
  2. Increased, particularly above a normal level.
    the elevated language of poetry
    The patient presented with elevated blood pressure.
  3. Of a higher rank or status.
  4. (computing) Running with administrator rights.
    Install all the required tools from an elevated console.
  5. (archaic, slang) Intoxicated; drunk.
    • 1836 March – 1837 October, Charles Dickens, “(please specify the chapter name)”, in The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1837, OCLC 28228280:
      ‘I hope,’ said Mr. Pickwick, ‘that our volatile friend is committing no absurdities in that dickey behind.’
      ‘Oh dear, no,’ replied Ben Allen. ‘Except when he’s elevated, Bob’s the quietest creature breathing.’
  6. (linguistics) Of a higher register or style.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

elevated (plural elevateds)

  1. (US) An elevated railway.
    • 1934, Dashiell Hammett, The Thin Man, New York: Knopf, Chapter 16,[1]
      Mr. Nunheim's home was on the fourth floor of a dark, damp, and smelly building made noisy by the Sixth Avenue elevated.
    • 2012, Roger P. Roess, Gene Sansone, The Wheels That Drove New York
      While the New York, Fordham, and Bronx Railway never built any elevateds, its franchise rights were valuable.

Derived termsEdit