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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French estranger (to treat as a stranger), from Latin extraneus (foreigner, stranger) (from which also English strange, stranger). Also see Spanish: extraño.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈstɹeɪndʒ/, /əˈstɹeɪndʒ/

VerbEdit

estrange (third-person singular simple present estranges, present participle estranging, simple past and past participle estranged)

  1. (transitive) To cause to feel less close or friendly; alienate. To cease contact with (particularly of a family member or spouse, especially in form estranged).
  2. (transitive) To remove from an accustomed place or set of associations.

Usage notesEdit

Largely synonymous with alienate, estrange is primarily used to mean “cut off relations”, particularly in a family setting, while alienate is rather used to refer to driving off (“he alienated her with his atrocious behavior”) or to offend a group (“the imprudent remarks alienated the urban demographic”).

When speaking of parents being estranged from a child of theirs, disown is frequently used instead, and has a stronger connotation.

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Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French estrange.

AdjectiveEdit

estrange m or f (plural estranges)

  1. strange; odd; bizarre
  2. foreign
    • circa 1369, Jean Froissart, Chroniques:
      Si vous alez guerroier en contree estrange
      If you're going to engage in warfare in a foreign country

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Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin extrāneus.

AdjectiveEdit

estrange m (oblique and nominative feminine singular estrange)

  1. foreign; overseas

NounEdit

estrange m (oblique plural estranges, nominative singular estranges, nominative plural estrange)

  1. foreigner; non-native

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DescendantsEdit