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See also: exubérant

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French exubérant, from Latin exūberāns, the present active participle of exūberō (be abundant). Put together from ex (out), and uber (udder), and originally would have referred to a cow or she-goat which was making so much milk that it naturally dripped or sprayed from the udder.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzuːbəɹənt/
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AdjectiveEdit

exuberant (comparative more exuberant, superlative most exuberant)

  1. (of people) Very high-spirited; extremely energetic and enthusiastic.
    • 1882, Frank R. Stockton, "The Lady or the Tiger?":
      He was a man of exuberant fancy, and, withal of an authority so irresistible that, at his will, he turned his varied fancies into facts.
    • 1961, Joseph Heller, Catch-22:
      She was a tall, earthy, exuberant girl with long hair and a pretty face.
  2. (of things that grow) Abundant, luxuriant, profuse, superabundant.
    • 1852, The Ark, and Odd Fellows' Western Magazine
      It pencilled each flower with rich and variegated hues, and threw over its exuberant foliage a vesture of emerald green.
    • 1972, Ken Lemmon, "Restoration Work at Studley Royal," Garden History, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 22:
      The County Architect's Department is starting to pleach trees to open up these vistas, now almost hidden by the exuberant growth.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.
  • Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary, 1987-1996.

LatinEdit