See also: Uber, ueber, über, uber-, and über-

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German über- (above), which is used both as a preposition and a prefix; cognate with over. Entered English through Nietzsche's use of the word Übermensch.

PronunciationEdit

Or, imitating the German, /ˈjuːbə/, /ˈɪuːbə/, /ˈyːbə/.

AdjectiveEdit

uber (not comparable)

  1. Super; high-level; high-ranking
    • 2006 February, GameAxis Unwired, number 30, page 4:
      people in Team GameAxis are no different from the rest of us although many would think them as uber geeks
    • 2008, Laura Levine, Killing Bridezilla:
      The fiasco begins with a call from Jaine's high-school nemesis, uber rich uber witch Patti Devane
    • 2009, J. F. Lewis, ReVamped, page 208:
      I laughed, a deep croaking noise in the uber vamp's body
    • 2009, Kurt Turrell, G.E.N.I.U.S. NOW: The Mastermind Blueprint, page 4:
      Moreover, this is a concrete venue for all businesses or organizations to champion a distinctive or necessary cause, and thereby secure “Uber Success” (off-the-charts results) for the future of their company or organization

AdverbEdit

uber (not comparable)

  1. Very; super
    • 2008, Laura Levine, Killing Bridezilla:
      The fiasco begins with a call from Jaine's high-school nemesis, uber rich uber witch Patti Devane
    • 2009, Mark Driscoll, Vintage Church: Timeless Truths and Timely Methods, page 268:
      Admittedly, churches do some incredibly goofy things when they pursue relevance for the sake of being uber hip and ultra cool. One pastor I know got so many piercings that he looked like a rack of lures at the Bass Pro Shop
    • 2010 April 29, “'Losers' minus one”, in Pasadena Weekly:
      The film's parallel story depicts Max (Jason Patric) as an uber powerful operative, barking wild orders at right-hand man Wade (Holt McCallany)

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈubɛr]
  • Hyphenation: uber

VerbEdit

uber

  1. second-person singular imperative of ubrat

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *ouðer, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ówHdʰr̥ (udder) (r/n-stem, with r made common to all cases). Cognates include Vedic Sanskrit ऊधर् (ū́dhar), Ancient Greek οὖθαρ (oûthar), Old English ūder, and modern English udder.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ūber n (genitive ūberis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) A teat, pap, dug, udder, a lactating breast
  2. richness, fruitfulness

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ūber ūbera
Genitive ūberis ūberum
Dative ūberī ūberibus
Accusative ūber ūbera
Ablative ūbere ūberibus
Vocative ūber ūbera

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: udzir, udzãri
  • Franco-Provençal: uvro
  • Friulian: luvri
  • Galician: ubre
  • Italian: ubere, ubero
  • Portuguese: ubre, úbere

AdjectiveEdit

ūber (genitive ūberis, comparative ūberior, superlative ūberrimus, adverb ūber or ūbertim); third-declension one-termination adjective (non-i-stem)

  1. fruitful, productive
  2. copious, full, rich

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension one-termination adjective (non-i-stem).

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative ūber ūberēs ūbera
Genitive ūberis ūberum
Dative ūberī ūberibus
Accusative ūberem ūber ūberēs ūbera
Ablative ūberī ūberibus
Vocative ūber ūberēs ūbera

AdverbEdit

ūber (comparative ūbius, superlative ūbissimē)

  1. fruitfully, copiously, plentifully
  2. (of style) fully, copiously

Usage notesEdit

The positive form of the adverb is not attested in Classical Latin.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • uber in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • uber in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • uber in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette