abundant

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested about 1380. From Middle English abundaunt,[1] habundaunt,[2] aboundant, from Anglo-Norman abundant, from Old French abondant, from Latin abundāns, present participle of abundo (to overflow, to abound). Compare abound.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abundant (comparative more abundant, superlative most abundant)

  1. Fully sufficient; found in copious supply; in great quantity; overflowing. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][3]
    • [W]ith their magical words they [poets] bring forth to our eyesight the abundant images and beauties of creation. — Leigh Hunt, On the Realities of Imagination
  2. Richly supplied; wealthy; possessing in great quantity. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][3]
    • Abundant in goodness and truth. — Exodus, 34:6
  3. (mathematics) Being an abundant number, i.e. less than the sum of all of its divisors except itself. [First attested in the mid 16th century.][3]

Usage notesEdit

  • (richly supplied): Normally followed by the word in or (obsolete) of.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ William Morris (editor), The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1971 [1969]; American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc.; ISBN 0-395-09066-0), page 6
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 8
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 10

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin abudans

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abundant m, f (masculine and feminine plural abundants)

  1. abundant; plentiful

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

abundant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of abundō
Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 02:55