See also: Fava and fává

EnglishEdit

 
Vicia faba

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian fava. Cognate with Spanish haba (broad bean). Doublet of bean.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fava (plural favas or fava)

  1. A fava bean; a bean (seed or seed pod) of the plant Vicia faba or the plant itself.
    • 1976, I. I. Gottesman, J. Shields, Rejoinder: Toward optimal arousal and away from original din, Schizophrenia Buletin, 2: 447-453, quoted in 2004, Jay Joseph, The Gene Illusion, page 269,
      Favism, a hemolytic anemia that follows the eating of fava or broadbeans, provides a textbook example of a genotype X environment interaction.
    • 2001, Clifford A. Wright, Mediterranean Vegetables, page 153,
      When spring arrives the fava arrives and everyone in the Mediterranean can dream up a way of cooking it.
    • 2007, Cat Cora et al., Cooking from the Hip[1], →ISBN, page 197:
      Add the favas and cook for 1 minute.
    • 2012, John Navazio, The Organic Seed Grower: A Farmer's Guide to Vegetable Seed Production, page 268,
      In cool temperate zones favas are planted early in the growing season, several weeks before the last frost, and grown as a summer annual, much like other vegetable crops of the Fabaceae.

Usage notesEdit

The collocation fava bean is much more common, even for the plant.

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faba, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰabʰ- (bean).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fava f (plural faves)

  1. fava bean

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faba, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰabʰ- (bean).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fava f (plural fave)

  1. (botany) fava bean, broad bean
  2. (vulgar, slang, Tuscany) cock
    Synonym: cazzo

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese fava, from Latin faba (bean), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰabʰ- (bean).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fava f (plural favas)

  1. fava bean (Vicia faba)