See also: Cock

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
A cock (1)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cok, from Old English coc, cocc (cock, male bird), from Proto-Germanic *kukkaz (cock), probably of onomatopoeic origin. Cognate with Middle Dutch cocke (cock, male bird) and Old Norse kokkr ("cock"; whence Danish kok (cock), dialectal Swedish kokk (cock)). Reinforced by Old French coc, also of imitative origin. The sense "penis" is attested since at least the 1610s, with the compound pillicock (penis) attested since 1325.

NounEdit

cock (countable and uncountable, plural cocks)

  1. A male bird, especially:
    1. A rooster: a male gallinaceous bird, especially a male domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).
    2. A cock pigeon.
  2. A valve or tap for controlling flow in plumbing.
    • 1864, Robert Niccol, Essay on Sugar, and General Treatise on Sugar Refining:
      The liquor is discharged from the cock S into liquor cans V [] , from which it is transferred to the sugar in the moulds. W represents one of the traps or stairs which communicate with respective floors of the sugarhouse.
  3. The hammer of a firearm trigger mechanism.
  4. The notch of an arrow or crossbow.
  5. (colloquial, vulgar) The penis.
  6. (curling) The circle at the end of the rink.
  7. The state of being cocked; an upward turn, tilt or angle.
  8. (Britain, New Zealand, derogatory, slang) A stupid person.
  9. (Britain, derogatory, slang, uncountable) Nonsense; rubbish.
    • 1956, William Golding, Pincher Martin:
      "You used to talk an awful lot of cock."
    • 2013, M. J. Trow, Swearing Like A Trooper: Rude Slang of World War Two:
      That Hitler's armies can't be beat is just a load of cock, / For Marshal Timoshenko's boys are pissing through von Bock []
  10. (informal, Britain, Tasmania) Term of address.
    All right, cock?
  11. A boastful tilt of one's head or hat.
  12. (informal) shuttlecock
  13. A vane in the shape of a cock; a weathercock.
  14. (dated, humorous) A chief man; a leader or master.
  15. The crow of a cock, especially the first crow in the morning; cockcrow.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 3, Scene 4, 1821, The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, page 159,
      This is the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet: he begins at curfew, and walks till the first cock;
  16. A male fish, especially a salmon or trout.
    • 2005, Roderick Sutterby, Malcolm Greenhalgh, “Life in the Nursery”, in Atlantic Salmon: An Illustrated Natural History, Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, →ISBN, page 21:
      As spawning time approaches – autumn or very early winter in most rivers, though in some late-run streams salmon may spawn as late as January or February – the hen's colouration becomes first a matt-pewter and then a drab dark brown-grey. The cock fish, in contrast, begins to gain some brighter colours.
    Synonym: cockfish
    Coordinate terms: hen, henfish
  17. The style or gnomon of a sundial.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chambers to this entry?)
  18. The indicator of a balance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  19. The bridge piece that affords a bearing for the pivot of a balance in a clock or watch.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Sranan Tongo: kaka
  • Tok Pisin: kok
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

cock (third-person singular simple present cocks, present participle cocking, simple past and past participle cocked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To lift the cock of a firearm or crossbow; to prepare (a gun or crossbow) to be fired.
    • 1812, Lord Byron, The Waltz
      Cocked, fired, and missed his man.
  2. (intransitive) To be prepared to be triggered by having the cock lifted.
    In the darkness, the gun cocked loudly.
  3. (transitive) To erect; to turn up.
    • 1720, John Gay, Thursday: Or, The Spell
      Our Lightfoot barks, and cocks his ears.
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, A Dialogue Between Mad Mullinix and Timothy
      Dick would cock his nose in scorn.
  4. (Britain, transitive, slang) To copulate with.
  5. (transitive) To turn or twist something upwards or to one side; to lift or tilt (e.g. headwear) boastfully.
    He cocked his hat jauntily.
  6. (intransitive, dated) To turn (the eye) obliquely and partially close its lid, as an expression of derision or insinuation.
  7. (intransitive, dated) To strut; to swagger; to look big, pert, or menacing.
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To make a nestle-cock of, to pamper or spoil (of children)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

InterjectionEdit

cock

  1. (slang) Expression of annoyance.
    • 2006, "Vamp", oh cock i should have kept with a toyota! (on newsgroup uk.rec.cars.modifications)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Uncertain. Some authors speculate it derives from cockle, a yonic fertility symbol,[1] others suggested it entered Southern US vernacular during the period of French rule (of Louisiana) from Cajun French coquille (shell) (itself the source of cockle), which in 18th and 19th century slang meant the vulva.[2]

NounEdit

cock (plural cocks)

  1. (Southern US, where it is now rare and dated; and African-American Vernacular, where it is still sometimes used) Vulva, vagina. [since at least the 1920s; less common after the 1960s]
    • c. 1920-1960, Rufus George Perryman (Speckled Red), quoted by Elijah Wald, The Dozens: A History of Rap's Mama:
      Born in the canebrake and you were suckled by a bear,
      Jumped right through your mammy's cock and never touched a hair.
    • 1933(–35?), Lucille Bogan, Till the cows come home:
      I told him I gotta good cock / and it's got four damn good names:
      Rough top, / rough cock, / tough cock, / cock without a bone.
      [] If you suck my pussy, / baby, I'll suck your dick.
    • 1949 March 2, Mrs. H. K. of Camden, Missouri, quoted by Vance Randolph, Unprintable Ozark Folksongs and Folklore: Roll me in your arms, Volume 1:
      I've got a girl in Castle Rock,
      She wears a moustache on her cock.
    • 1998, Scarface, Fuck Faces (song):
      I stuck my fist up in her cock, she didn't budge or move it.
    • 2010, Vildred C. Tucker-Dawson, A Journey Back in Time: My Story Book:
      She smelled like she was on her period and hadn't changed pads. On ah many occasions I heard men say her cock smelled through her clothing.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Elijah Wald, The Dozens: A History of Rap's Mama
  2. ^ Vance Randolph, Unprintable Ozark Folksongs and Folklore: Roll me in your arms, Volume 1: "cock [...] is a southernism [...] where a northerner would say, or expect, cunt. This confusing usage originated during the French domination of the U. S. south; it comes from the French term, [...] coquille, cockleshell, for the vagina"; the work has examples from as early as 1927

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English cokke, cock, cok, from Old English -cocc (attested in place names), from Old Norse kǫkkr (lump), from Proto-Germanic *kukkaz (bulge, swelling), from Proto-Indo-European *geugh- (swelling). Cognate with Norwegian kok (heap, lump), Swedish koka (a lump of earth), German Kocke (heap of hay, dunghill), Middle Low German kogge (wide, rounded ship), Dutch kogel (ball), German Kugel (ball, globe).

NounEdit

cock (plural cocks)

  1. A small conical pile of hay.
    The farmhands stack the hay into cocks
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cock (third-person singular simple present cocks, present participle cocking, simple past and past participle cocked)

  1. (transitive) To form into piles.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

from Middle English cok, from Old French coque (a type of small boat), from child-talk coco 'egg'

NounEdit

cock (plural cocks)

  1. Abbreviation of cock-boat, a type of small boat.

Etymology 5Edit

Proper nounEdit

cock

  1. (obsolete) A corruption of the word God, used in oaths.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for cock in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)