Latin edit

Etymology edit

Uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to be, become) via a stative *bʰh₂weh₁yeti (to be favorable to)[1] (> *fawēō) or a causative *bʰowh₂eyeti[2] (> *foweō). Alternatively, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰew- (cognate with Proto-Slavic *gověti) via *gʷʰoweti > *foweō.[2] The latter two derivations would be examples of unrounding of *o before *w.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

faveō (present infinitive favēre, perfect active fāvī, supine fautum); second conjugation, impersonal in the passive

  1. to be favorable, to be well disposed or inclined towards, to favor, promote, befriend, countenance, protect
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 6.249–250:
      Vesta, favē! tibi nunc operāta resolvimus ōra,
      ad tua sī nōbīs sacra venīre licet.
      Vesta, be favorable! Devoted to you, we now unbind our lips; [that is], if we are permitted to come to your sacrifices.
      (See Vesta (mythology); Vestalia.)
  2. (with dative) to favour
    • 239 BCE – 169 BCE, Ennius, Annales :
      Rōmānīs Iūnō coepit plācāta favēre
      Placated, Juno started to favour the Romans
  3. (with dative) to countenance, applaud, support, encourage, indulge
    Synonym: foveō

Conjugation edit

   Conjugation of faveō (second conjugation, impersonal in passive)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present faveō favēs favet favēmus favētis favent
imperfect favēbam favēbās favēbat favēbāmus favēbātis favēbant
future favēbō favēbis favēbit favēbimus favēbitis favēbunt
perfect fāvī fāvistī,
fāstī1
fāvit,
fāt1
fāvimus,
fāmus1
fāvistis,
fāstis1
fāvērunt,
fāvēre,
fārunt1
pluperfect fāveram,
fāram1
fāverās,
fārās1
fāverat,
fārat1
fāverāmus,
fārāmus1
fāverātis,
fārātis1
fāverant,
fārant1
future perfect fāverō,
fārō1
fāveris,
fāris1
fāverit,
fārit1
fāverimus,
fārimus1
fāveritis,
fāritis1
fāverint,
fārint1
passive present favētur
imperfect favēbātur
future favēbitur
perfect fautum est
pluperfect fautum erat
future perfect fautum erit
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present faveam faveās faveat faveāmus faveātis faveant
imperfect favērem favērēs favēret favērēmus favērētis favērent
perfect fāverim,
fārim1
fāverīs,
fārīs1
fāverit,
fārit1
fāverīmus,
fārīmus1
fāverītis,
fārītis1
fāverint,
fārint1
pluperfect fāvissem,
fāssem1
fāvissēs,
fāssēs1
fāvisset,
fāsset1
fāvissēmus,
fāssēmus1
fāvissētis,
fāssētis1
fāvissent,
fāssent1
passive present faveātur
imperfect favērētur
perfect fautum sit
pluperfect fautum esset,
fautum foret
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present favē favēte
future favētō favētō favētōte faventō
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives favēre fāvisse,
fāsse1
fautūrum esse favērī fautum esse
participles favēns fautūrus fautum favendum
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
favendī favendō favendum favendō fautum fautū

1At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “faveō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 206: “faveō may reflect *bʰh₂u̯-eh₁-”
  2. 2.0 2.1 Schrijver, Peter C. H. (1991) The reflexes of the Proto-Indo-European laryngeals in Latin (Leiden studies in Indo-European; 2), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 441: “There are three hypotheses about its etymology. faveo reflects *bhouH-eie- (thus e.g. Thurneysen op. cit.), which is a causative of *bhuH- 'to be'. [...] The third possibility is that faveō reflects *gʷhou-

Further reading edit

  • faveo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • faveo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • faveo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • maintain a devout silence (properly, utter no ill-omened word): favete ore, linguis = εὐφημειτε
    • (ambiguous) to look favourably upon; to support: studere, favere alicui
    • (ambiguous) to be a friend of the aristocracy: nobilitati favere (Sest. 9. 21)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[2], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN