English

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Etymology

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From fidge (to fidget) +‎ *-et (frequentative ending), possibly from Middle English *-ten, from Old English -ettan.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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fidget (third-person singular simple present fidgets, present participle fidgeting or fidgetting, simple past and past participle fidgeted or fidgetted)

  1. (intransitive) To wiggle or twitch; to move the body, especially the fingers, around nervously or idly.
    • 1881–1882, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island, London, Paris: Cassell & Company, published 14 November 1883, →OCLC:
      "Look, Jim, how my fingers fidget," he continued, in the pleading tone. "I can't keep e'm still, not I."
    • 1993, Mike Leigh, Naked, spoken by Johnny (David Thewlis):
      Will you stop fucking about and fidgeting in my peripherals? I'm trying to concentrate.
  2. (transitive) To cause to fidget; to make uneasy.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Noun

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fidget (plural fidgets)

  1. A nervous wriggling or twitching motion.
  2. (informal) A person who fidgets, especially habitually.
    Synonym: fidgeter
  3. An object intended to be fidgeted with (such as a tool or toy).

Derived terms

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Translations

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Anagrams

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