Open main menu

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flamen (plural flamens or flamines)

  1. A priest devoted to the service of a particular god, from whom he received a distinguishing epithet. The most honored were those of Jupiter, Mars, and Quirinus, called respectively Flamen Dialis, Flamen Martialis, and Flamen Quirinalis.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlag- (to hit, strike, beat).[1] Other etymologies point to *bhleh₂- (no meaning given), or *bhlg- (to shine, burn).[2] Traditionally asserted relationships to Sanskrit ब्रह्मन् (bráhman), Old Norse blót via conjectured PIE *bʰlag-, *bʰlād- present difficulties.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flāmen m (genitive flāminis); third declension

  1. priest, flamen
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative flāmen flāminēs
Genitive flāminis flāminum
Dative flāminī flāminibus
Accusative flāminem flāminēs
Ablative flāmine flāminibus
Vocative flāmen flāminēs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: flamen
  • Portuguese: flâmine

Etymology 2Edit

From flō (I breathe, blow) +‎ -men (noun-forming suffix).

NounEdit

flāmen n (genitive flāminis); third declension

  1. blast, gust (of wind)
  2. breeze
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative flāmen flāmina
Genitive flāminis flāminum
Dative flāminī flāminibus
Accusative flāmen flāmina
Ablative flāmine flāminibus
Vocative flāmen flāmina

Further readingEdit

  • flamen in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • flamen in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • flamen in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • flamen in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • flamen in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  2. ^ Michiel de Vaan (ed.): Etymological Dictionary of Latin. Ph. D. 2002. Brill, Leiden 2008, s. v. “flāmen”, first published online October 2010.