See also: Gust and gušt

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡʌst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst
  • (file)

Etymology 1 edit

Apparently from an unrecorded Middle English *gust, from Old Norse gustr (a gust, blast), from Proto-Germanic *gustiz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰew-. Cognate with Icelandic gustur (gust of wind). Related also to Old Norse gusa (to gush forth), Old High German gussa (flood), Middle English guschen (> English gush). The English word was not recorded before Shakespeare.

Noun edit

gust (plural gusts)

  1. A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
    Synonym: windflaw
    • 2017 August 26, Anne Marie Roantree, Venus Wu, “Battered Hong Kong and Macau brace for Pakhar, more flooding”, in Andrew Hay, editor, Reuters[1], archived from the original on 2023-08-05, COMMODITIES NEWS‎[2]:
      The maximum sustained winds recorded at Waglan Island, Tate’s Cairn and Cheung Chau Beach were 113, 101 and 97 kmh (70, 62, 60 mph) respectively, with maximum gusts 135, 154 and 130 kmh (84, 96, 81 mph)
  2. (by extension) Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion, etc.).
    • 1609 (revised 1625), Francis Bacon, De Sapientia Veterum ('Wisdom of the Ancients')
      they are merely driven about by every sudden gust and impulse of the mind
    • 1869 May, Anthony Trollope, “Hard Words”, in He Knew He Was Right, volume I, London: Strahan and Company, [], →OCLC, page 73:
      The author is not speaking now of actual love-makings, of intrigues and devilish villany, either perpetrated or imagined; but rather of those passing gusts of short-lived and unfounded suspicion to which, as to other accidents, very well-regulated families may occasionally be liable.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To blow in gusts.
    • 2019 April 25, Samanth Subramanian, “Hand dryers v paper towels: the surprisingly dirty fight for the right to dry your hands”, in The Guardian[3]:
      Do the dryers disperse bacteria and viruses through the restroom, like autumn breezes gusting leaves across a lawn?
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English gust, guste, from Latin gustus (taste) and Old French gust, goust.

Noun edit

gust (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  2. Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
    • 1651, Jer[emy] Taylor, “[XXVIII Sermons Preached at Golden Grove; Being for the Summer Half-year, [].] ”, in ΕΝΙΑΥΤΟΣ [Eniautos]. A Course of Sermons for All the Sundays of the Year. [], 2nd edition, London: [] Richard Royston [], published 1654, →OCLC:
      , "The Spirit of Grace"
      An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
    • 1733, [Alexander Pope], An Essay on Man. [], (please specify |epistle=I to IV), London: Printed for J[ohn] Wilford, [], →OCLC:
      Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust.
    • 1942: ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn gust. — Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  3. Intellectual taste; fancy.
    • 1695, C[harles] A[lphonse] du Fresnoy, translated by John Dryden, De Arte Graphica. The Art of Painting, [], London: [] J[ohn] Heptinstall for W. Rogers, [], →OCLC:
      A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English gusten (to taste, have a taste for), from the noun (see above)).

Verb edit

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To taste.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To have a relish for.
Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin gustus, from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus. First attested in the 14th century,[1] it was possibly a semi-learned word or early borrowing;[2] compare the sound changes in the inherited Occitan gost, Portuguese gosto, and French goût.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gust m (plural gusts or gustos)

  1. taste (sense)
  2. flavour
    Synonym: sabor
  3. relish, pleasure
    Synonym: plaer
  4. taste (aesthetic preference), style
    molt al gust borbònicvery much in the Bourbon style

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ gust”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024
  2. ^ Joan Coromines, José A. Pascual (1983–1991) Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos

Further reading edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin gustus, from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus. Possibly a borrowing or semi-learned term.

Noun edit

gust m (plural gusts)

  1. relish, zest, enjoyment
  2. taste

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Icelandic edit

Noun edit

gust

  1. indefinite accusative singular of gustur

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin gustus, ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gust m inan (diminutive guścik)

  1. taste, personal preference
    Antonyms: bezguście, kicz

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjective
noun
verb

Further reading edit

  • gust in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gust in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin gustus, from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus.

Noun edit

gust n (plural gusturi)

  1. taste
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Latin (mensis) augustus (through Vulgar Latin agustus). Compare also Albanian gusht (August).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

gust m (uncountable)

  1. (popular/folk usage, rare) August
    Synonyms: (standard/most common) august; (popular/folk name) gustar; (popular/folk name) măsălar
Derived terms edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gǫstъ.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

gȗst (Cyrillic spelling гу̑ст, definite gȗstī, comparative gȕšćī)

  1. dense

Declension edit