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See also: Gust and gušt

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Apparently from Old Norse gustr, from Proto-Germanic *gustiz. However, the English word was not recorded before Shakespeare.

NounEdit

gust (plural gusts)

  1. a strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  2. any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).
    • 1868, Anthony Trollope, He Knew He Was Right X
      It is to be feared that men in general do not regret as they should do any temporary ill-feeling, or irritating jealousy between husbands and wives, of which they themselves have been the cause. The author is not speaking now of actual love-makings, of intrigues and devilish villany, either perpetrated or imagined; but rather of those passing gusts of short-lived and unfounded suspicion to which, as to other accidents, very well-regulated families may occasionally be liable.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (intransitive) To blow in gusts.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin gustus (taste). For the verb, compare Latin gustare, Italian gustare, Spanish gustar.

NounEdit

gust (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  2. Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
    • Alexander Pope
      Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust.
    • 1942: ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn gust. — Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  3. Intellectual taste; fancy.
    • Dryden
      A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.

VerbEdit

gust (third-person singular simple present gusts, present participle gusting, simple past and past participle gusted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To taste.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To have a relish for.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gustus.

NounEdit

gust m (plural gusts or gustos)

  1. taste

Derived termsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gustus.

NounEdit

gust m (plural gusts)

  1. relish, zest, enjoyment
  2. taste

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

gust

  1. indefinite accusative singular of gustur

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gust m inan (diminutive guścik)

  1. taste, personal preference

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin gustus, from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus.

NounEdit

gust n (plural gusturi)

  1. taste
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Latin (mensis) augustus (through Vulgar Latin *agustus). Compare also Albanian gusht (August).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

gust m (uncountable)

  1. (popular, rare) August
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *gǫstъ.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gȗst (definite gȗstī, comparative gȕšćī, Cyrillic spelling гу̑ст)

  1. dense

DeclensionEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

gust m

  1. horror, horrible feeling upon witnessing something