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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French fugue, from Italian fuga (flight, ardor), from Latin fuga (act of fleeing), from fugere (to flee); compare Ancient Greek φυγή (phugḗ). Apparently from the metaphor that the first part starts alone on its course, and is pursued by later parts.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfjuːɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːɡ

NounEdit

fugue (plural fugues)

  1. (music) A contrapuntal piece of music wherein a particular melody is played in a number of voices, each voice introduced in turn by playing the melody.
  2. Anything in literature, poetry, film, painting, etc., that resembles a fugue in structure or in its elaborate complexity and formality.
  3. A fugue state.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fugue (third-person singular simple present fugues, present participle fuguing, simple past and past participle fugued)

  1. To improvise, in singing, by introducing vocal ornamentation to fill gaps etc.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inflected forms of fuguer.

VerbEdit

fugue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fuguer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fuguer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fuguer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fuguer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fuguer

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin fuga. Doublet of fougue.

NounEdit

fugue f (plural fugues)

  1. (informal) running away (from a place where one was staying)
  2. (music) fugue

SynonymsEdit

  • (running away): fuite : flight, fleeing

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fugue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fugar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fugar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fugar.