EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the French fumet (aroma), from Latin fumus (smoke). Doublet of fumetto.

NounEdit

fumet (countable and uncountable, plural fumets)

  1. A type of concentrated food stock that is added to sauces to enhance their flavour. Variations are fish fumet and mushroom fumet.
  2. A ragout of partridge and rabbit braised in wine.
  3. Alternative form of fumette (stench or high flavour of meat)

Etymology 2Edit

Compare French fumier dung, Old French femier, from Latin fimum (dung). See fewmet.

NounEdit

fumet

  1. The dung of deer, hares, etc.
    • 1780, Nicholas Cox, The Huntsman[1], page 57:
      The next thing to be considered, is the Fumishing ; and this is to be judged of in April or May. If the Fumets be great, large and thick, they signify the Hart to be old.
    • 1825, Oliver Goldsmith, A History of the Earth, and Animated Nature, volume II, page 187:
      When he cries he is said to bell; the print of his hoof is called the slot; his tail is called the single; his excrement the fumet; his horns are called his head; []

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From fumer + -et.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fy.mɛ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

fumet m (plural fumets)

  1. aroma, odor (of meat etc.); bouquet (of wine)
  2. (hunting) scent

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

fūmet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of fūmō