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See also: odôr and odør

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English odour, borrowed from Anglo-Norman odour, from Old French odor, from Latin odor.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈəʊ.də/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈoʊ.dɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊdə(r)
  • Homophone: oater (some dialects)

NounEdit

odor (countable and uncountable, plural odors)

  1. Any smell, whether fragrant or offensive; scent; perfume.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
      Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing. Yet oddly enough I found here a far more unlikely substance, and that was camphor. I found it in a sealed jar, that, by chance, I supposed had been really hermetically sealed. I fancied at first the stuff was paraffin wax, and smashed the jar accordingly. But the odour of camphor was unmistakable.
  2. (figuratively) A strong, pervasive quality.
  3. (figuratively, uncountable) Esteem; repute.

Usage notesEdit

In the United States, the term odor often has a negative connotation. Preferred terms for a pleasant odor are "fragrance", "scent", and "aroma".

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /oˈdor/, [oˈd̪or̺]
  • Stress: odór
  • Hyphenation: o‧dor

NounEdit

odor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of odore

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via rhotacism from Old Latin odōs (plural: odōses), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor m (genitive odōris); third declension

  1. A smell, perfume, stench.
  2. (figuratively) Inkling, suggestion.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative odor odōrēs
genitive odōris odōrum
dative odōrī odōribus
accusative odōrem odōrēs
ablative odōre odōribus
vocative odor odōrēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • odor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • odor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • odor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • odor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • with incense and perfumes: ture et odoribus incensis
    • the perfume exhaled by flowers: odores, qui efflantur e floribus
    • there are whispers of the appointment of a dictator: non nullus odor est dictaturae (Att. 4. 18)

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

odor

  1. Alternative form of odour

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese odor (displacing collateral form olor), from Latin odor, odōris, from Old Latin odōs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed- (to smell, stink).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ɔ.ˈðoɾ/, /o.ˈðoɾ/, /u.ˈðoɾ/
  • Hyphenation: o‧dor

NounEdit

odor m (plural odores)

  1. odour; smell

SynonymsEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin odor, odōrem. Compare Italian odore.

NounEdit

odor m (plural odori) or odor m (plural oduri)

  1. smell, stink