See also: Odor, odór, odôr, and odør

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English odour, borrowed from Anglo-Norman odour, from Old French odor, from Latin odor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor (countable and uncountable, plural odors) (American spelling)

  1. Any smell, whether fragrant or offensive.
    Synonyms: scent, perfume; see also Thesaurus:smell
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
      Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing. Yet oddly enough I found here a far more unlikely substance, and that was camphor. I found it in a sealed jar, that, by chance, I supposed had been really hermetically sealed. I fancied at first the stuff was paraffin wax, and smashed the jar accordingly. But the odour of camphor was unmistakable.
  2. (figuratively) A strong, pervasive quality.
  3. (figuratively, uncountable) Esteem.
    Synonyms: esteem, repute
  4. (now rare) Something which produces a scent; incense, a perfume.

Usage notesEdit

The term odo(u)r often has a negative connotation. Preferred terms for a pleasant odor are fragrance, scent, and aroma.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /oˈdor/
  • Hyphenation: o‧dór

NounEdit

odor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of odore

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via rhotacism from Old Latin odōs (plural: odōses), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor m (genitive odōris); third declension

  1. A smell, perfume, stench.
  2. (figuratively) Inkling, suggestion.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative odor odōrēs
Genitive odōris odōrum
Dative odōrī odōribus
Accusative odōrem odōrēs
Ablative odōre odōribus
Vocative odor odōrēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • odor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • odor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • odor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • odor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • with incense and perfumes: ture et odoribus incensis
    • the perfume exhaled by flowers: odores, qui efflantur e floribus
    • there are whispers of the appointment of a dictator: non nullus odor est dictaturae (Att. 4. 18)

LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin odōrem.

NounEdit

odor

  1. a smell

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

odor

  1. Alternative form of odour

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese odor (displacing collateral form olor), from Latin odor, odōris, from Old Latin odōs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed- (to smell, stink).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor m (plural odores)

  1. odour; smell
    Synonyms: cheiro, aroma

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Serbo-Croatian odor

NounEdit

odor n (plural odoare)

  1. treasure

DeclensionEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin odor, odōrem. Compare Italian odore.

NounEdit

odor m (plural odori) or odor m (plural oduri)

  1. smell, stink