English

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A fusil (heraldric symbol).
 
A fusil (flintlock musket), 1766 model.

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old French fusel, fuisel, from a late Latin diminutive of Latin fūsus (spindle).

Noun

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fusil (plural fusils)

  1. (heraldry) A bearing of a rhomboidal figure, originally representing a spindle in shape, longer than a heraldic lozenge.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Middle French fusil, ultimately from Latin focus (hearth; fire). Doublet of fusee.

Noun

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fusil (plural fusils)

  1. (now historical) A light flintlock musket or firelock.
    • 1751, [Tobias] Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to IV), London: Harrison and Co., [], →OCLC:
      [H]e out of meer wantonness attempted to trip up the heels of the soldier that stood next him, but failed in the execution, and received a blow of his breast with the butt end of a fusil, that made him stagger several paces backward.
Synonyms
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Translations
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Etymology 3

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Alternative forms.

Adjective

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fusil (comparative more fusil, superlative most fusil)

  1. Obsolete spelling of fusile.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book XI”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      what might else be wrought / Fusil or grav'n in metal
    • 1708, [John Philips], “Book II”, in Cyder. [], London: [] J[acob] Tonson, [], →OCLC, page 70:
      A fusil sea.
    • 1728, J[ohn] Woodward, “A Catalogue of the Second Addition of English Native Fossils”, in A Catalogue of the Additional English Native Fossils, in the Collection of J. Woodward M.D., tome II, London: [] F[rancis] Fayram, []; J[ohn] Senex, []; and J. Osborn and T[homas] Longman, [], →OCLC, page 91:
      Part of one of thoſe round Pillars that are commonly ſuppos'd to be fuſil marble: but not truly; this being of the common Suſſex Marble, full of Sea-Shells.

French

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Etymology

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From Old French fuisil, foisil, from Vulgar Latin *focīlis (petra), from Latin focus. Compare Italian fucile.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fusil m (plural fusils)

  1. rifle, gun
  2. steel to strike sparks from a flint (pierre à fusil)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Saint Dominican Creole French: fisil
  • Catalan: fusell
  • Spanish: fusil
  • Portuguese: fuzil

Further reading

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French fusil.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /fuˈsil/ [fuˈsil]
  • Rhymes: -il
  • Syllabification: fu‧sil

Noun

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fusil m (plural fusiles)

  1. rifle
    Synonym: rifle

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Further reading

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