EnglishEdit

 
A fusil (heraldric symbol)
 
A fusil (flintlock musket), 1766 model

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfjuːzɪl/
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French fusel, fuisel, from a late Latin diminutive of Latin fūsus (spindle).

NounEdit

fusil (plural fusils)

  1. (heraldry) A bearing of a rhomboidal figure, originally representing a spindle in shape, longer than a heraldic lozenge.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French fusil, ultimately from Latin focus (hearth; fire). Doublet of fusee.

NounEdit

fusil (plural fusils)

  1. (now historical) A light flintlock musket or firelock.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol II, ch. 43:
      [H]e out of meer wantonness attempted to trip up the heels of the soldier that stood next him, but failed in the execution, and received a blow of his breast with the butt end of a fusil, that made him stagger several paces backward.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Alternative forms.

AdjectiveEdit

fusil (comparative more fusil, superlative most fusil)

  1. Obsolete spelling of fusile

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fuisil, foisil, from Vulgar Latin *focīlis (petra), from Latin focus. Compare Italian fucile.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fusil m (plural fusils)

  1. rifle, gun
  2. steel to strike sparks from a flint (pierre à fusil)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Saint Dominican Creole French: fisil
  • Catalan: fusell
  • Spanish: fusil

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French fusil.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fusil m (plural fusiles)

  1. rifle
    Synonym: rifle

DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit