rifle

EnglishEdit

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a rifle (Mauser K98)

EtymologyEdit

Middle English, from Old French rifler (to scrape off, plunder), from Old Low Franconian *riffilōn (compare obsolete Dutch rijffelen 'to scrape', Old English geriflian (to wrinkle), Middle High German riffeln (to scratch, heckle (flax)), Old High German riffilōn (to saw, rub apart)), frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną (compare Old Norse rifa (to tear, break)). More at rive.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rifle (plural rifles)

  1. A long firearm firing a single projectile, usually with a rifled barrel to improve accuracy.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Still, a dozen men with rifles, and cartridges to match, stayed behind when they filed through a white aldea lying silent amid the cane, and the Sin Verguenza swung into slightly quicker stride.
  2. A strip of wood covered with emery or a similar material, used for sharpening scythes.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

rifle (third-person singular simple present rifles, present participle rifling, simple past and past participle rifled)

  1. to search with intent to steal; to ransack, pillage or plunder.
  2. To scan many items (especially papers) in a set, quickly. (See also riffle[2])
    She made a mess when she rifled through the stack of papers, looking for the title document.
  3. To add a spiral to the interior of a gun bore to make a fired bullet spin in flight to improve range and accuracy.
  4. To strike something with great power.
    • 2010 December 28, Marc Vesty, “Stoke 0 - 2 Fulham”, BBC:
      Davies's cross was headed away from danger by Robert Huth, only for Baird to take the ball in his stride and rifle his right-footed effort towards the corner from the edge of the box.
  5. (intransitive) To commit robbery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)
  6. (transitive) To strip of goods; to rob; to pillage.
    • Shakespeare
      Stand, sir, and throw us that you have about ye: / If not, we'll make you sit and rifle you.
  7. To seize and bear away by force; to snatch away; to carry off.
    • Alexander Pope
      Time shall rifle every youthful grace.
  8. To raffle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Webster to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From American English rifle (19th century).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle (carabine)

Related termsEdit

  • .22 Long Rifle

VerbEdit

rifle

  1. first-person singular present indicative of rifler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of rifler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  5. second-person singular imperative of rifler

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English rifle, from Middle English, from Old French rifler (to scrape off, plunder), from Old Low Franconian *rifillon, frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 09:51