KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese gelo. Cognate with Guinea-Bissau Creole djelu.

NounEdit

gelu

  1. ice

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold). Related to English cold.

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gelū n sg (genitive gelūs); fourth declension

  1. frost
    • 15th century, A nominale [with a mentioning]. In: Anglo-Saxon and old English vocabularies by Thomas Wright. Second edition. Edited and collated by Richard Paul Wülcker. Volume I: Vocabularies, London, 1884, column 736:
      Hoc gelu, indeclinabile, frost.
  2. cold, chill

DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun (neuter), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative gelū
Genitive gelūs
Dative gelū
Accusative gelū
Ablative gelū
Vocative gelū

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: dzer
  • Asturian: xelu
  • Catalan: gel
  • English: gel
  • French: gel
  • Galician: xeo
  • Italian: gelo
  • Ligurian: zêo
  • Occitan: gèl
  • Portuguese: gelo
    • Guinea-Bissau Creole: djelu
    • Kabuverdianu: gelu
  • Romanian: ger
  • Sardinian: ghelu, belu, gelu
  • Sicilian: jelu
  • Spanish: hielo
  • Venetian: geło, xeło

ReferencesEdit

  • gelu”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gelu”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gelu in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be numb with cold: frigore (gelu) rigere, torpere

Old SaxonEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gelu

  1. Alternative form of gelo