See also: Geld and geldt

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English geld and Medieval Latin geldum, both from Old English geld, ġield (payment, tribute), from Proto-Germanic *geldą (reward, gift, money), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeldʰ- (to pay). Cognate with North Frisian jild (money), Saterland Frisian Jäild (money), Dutch geld (money), German Geld (money), Old Norse gjald (payment), Gothic 𐌲𐌹𐌻𐌳 (gild). Also related to English yield. Geld is also written gelt or gild, and as such found in wergild, Danegeld, etc. Probably reinforced by gelt (which see).

NounEdit

geld (plural gelds)

  1. Money; notably:
    1. A tribute
    2. A compensation, notably a financial one
    3. A ransom.
    4. A medieval form of Land Tax
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse gelda (geld, castrate), from geldr (yielding no milk, dry), cognate with Old High German galt[1]. Cognate with Gothic 𐌲𐌹𐌻𐌸𐌰 (gilþa, sickle)[2]. Compare the archaic German Gelze, “castrated swine” and gelzen (castrate), Danish galt (boar) (from Old Norse gǫltr (boar, hog), cognate with English gilt) and gilde (to geld). "gelding" derives from Old Norse geldingr.[1]

VerbEdit

geld (third-person singular simple present gelds, present participle gelding, simple past and past participle gelded or gelt)

  1. (transitive) To castrate a male (usually an animal).
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room, Vintage Classics, paperback edition, page 16-17
      "Poor old Topaz," said Mrs Flanders, as he stretched himself out in the sun, and she smiled, thinking how she had had him gelded, and how she did not like red hair in men.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 geld” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. ^ geld in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch geld "money", cognate with German Geld "money", Old Norse/Danish Tongue gjald "payment", Gothic gild "tribute"

NounEdit

geld (plural geld)

  1. money

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch gheld, ghelt, from Old Dutch geld, from Proto-Germanic *geldą (reward, gift, money), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeldʰ- (to pay). Cognate with English geld, yield, German Geld "money", West Frisian jild, Old Norse/Danish Tongue gjald "payment", Gothic gild "tribute"

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

geld n (plural gelden)

  1. money

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

geld

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gelden
  2. imperative of gelden

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

geld (comparative mair geld, superlative maist geld)

  1. Alternative form of yeld.
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 10:37