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See also: Frost and fröst

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EnglishEdit

 frost on Wikipedia
 
Frost on a leaf and grass.
 
Close-up look at frost crystals.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English frost, from Old English frost (frost), from Proto-Germanic *frustaz (frost), from Proto-Indo-European *prews- (to freeze; frost). Cognate with West Frisian froast (frost), Dutch vorst (frost), German Frost (frost), Swedish frost (frost), Icelandic frost (frost), Latin pruīna (hoarfrost, frost, rime, snow). Related to freeze.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

frost (countable and uncountable, plural frosts)

  1. A cover of minute ice crystals on objects that are exposed to the air. Frost is formed by the same process as dew, except that the temperature of the frosted object is below freezing.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 47.
      It is more probable, in almost every country of Europe, that there will be frost sometime in January, than that the weather will continue open throughout that whole month;
  2. The cold weather that causes these ice crystals to form.
  3. (figuratively) Coldness or insensibility; severity or rigidity of character.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      It was one of those moments of intense feeling when the frost of the Scottish people melts like a snow-wreath.
  4. (obsolete) The act of freezing; the congelation of water or other liquid.
  5. A shade of white, like that of frost.
    frost colour:  
  6. (slang, dated) A disappointment; a cheat.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

frost (third-person singular simple present frosts, present participle frosting, simple past and past participle frosted)

  1. (transitive) To cover with frost.
  2. (intransitive) To become covered with frost.
  3. (transitive) To coat (something, e.g. a cake) with icing to resemble frost.
  4. (transitive) To anger or annoy.
    I think the boss's decision frosted him a bit.
  5. (transitive) To sharpen (the points of a horse's shoe) to prevent it from slipping on ice.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse frost.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /frɔst/, [fʁ̥ʌsd̥]

NounEdit

frost c (singular definite frosten, not used in plural form)

  1. frost

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse frost.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

frost n (genitive singular frosts, nominative plural frost)

  1. frost

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English frost, forst, from Proto-Germanic *frustaz, *frustą; akin to Middle Dutch vorst, Middle High German vrost, Middle Low German vrost, and Old Swedish frost.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfrɔst/, /ˈfɔrst/

NounEdit

frost (plural frostes)

  1. Cold, freezing, or frosty weather; weather that causes frost.
  2. Frost or rime; frozen dew or water droplets.
  3. Hail; precipitation below freezing temperature
  4. (rare, figuratively) Something with a chilling effect.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse frost n.

NounEdit

frost m (definite singular frosten)

  1. frost

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse frost n

NounEdit

frost m (definite singular frosten)

  1. frost

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *frustą, *frustaz, akin to Old High German frost, Old Norse frost.

NounEdit

frost m

  1. frost

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *frustą, *frustaz, akin to Old English frost, Old Norse frost.

NounEdit

frost m

  1. frost

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *frustą, *frustaz, akin to Old English frost, Old High German frost.

NounEdit

frost n

  1. frost

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • frost in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse frost, from Proto-Germanic *frustą, *frustaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

frost c

  1. frost

DeclensionEdit

Declension of frost 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative frost frosten
Genitive frosts frostens