Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gilden, gulden, from Old English gyldan (to gild, to cover with a thin layer of gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþijaną, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gild (third-person singular simple present gilds, present participle gilding, simple past and past participle gilded or gilt)

  1. (transitive) To cover with a thin layer of gold; to cover with gold leaf.
    • 1888 May, Oscar Wilde, “The Happy Prince”, in The Happy Prince and Other Tales, London: David Nutt, [], OCLC 595167, page 1:
      High above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince. He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt.
  2. (transitive) To adorn.
  3. (transitive, cooking) To decorate with a golden surface appearance.
    • 2008, Ivan P. Day, Cooking in Europe, 1650-1850 (page 98)
      Gild the entire outside with beaten egg yolk, and sprinkle it with grated parmesan.
  4. (transitive) To give a bright or pleasing aspect to.
  5. (transitive) To make appear drunk.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

gild (plural gilds)

  1. Obsolete form of guild.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

gild

  1. Romanization of 𐌲𐌹𐌻𐌳

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English guild.

NounEdit

gild m (genitive singular gild, nominative plural gildeanna)

  1. (historical) guild
    Synonym: cuallacht

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gild ghild ngild
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit