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See also: gél, Gel, GEL, and gęl

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EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Coined by Thomas Graham in the mid 19th century as a clipping of gelatin, from French gélatine, from Italian gelatina, diminutive form of gelata (iced), from Latin gelata, past participle of gelo (to freeze), from gelu (frost), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel (countable and uncountable, plural gels)

  1. A semi-solid to almost solid colloid of a solid and a liquid, such as jelly, cheese or opal.
    • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200:
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—surgical foam, a thermal gel depot, a microcapsule or biodegradable polymer beads.
  2. Any gel intended for a particular cosmetic use, such as for styling the hair.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

For more information on classification of colloids, see Wikipedia article on colloids

VerbEdit

gel (third-person singular simple present gels, present participle gelling, simple past and past participle gelled)

  1. (transitive) To apply (cosmetic) gel to (the hair, etc).
    • 2017 June 3, Daniel Taylor, “Real Madrid win Champions League as Cristiano Ronaldo double defeats Juv”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      It ended, as it so often does, with that familiar smile. Cristiano Ronaldo – gelled hair, dazzling teeth, magic in his boots – will never forget the night he scored the 600th goal of an almost implausible career.
  1. (intransitive) To become a gel.
  2. (intransitive) To develop a rapport.
    • He was a nice guy, and I got on OK with his friends, but the two of us never really gelled.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Imitative of upper-class British pronunciation of girl.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel (plural gels)

  1. (Britain) A girl.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal, from Latin gelū, from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel m (plural gels)

  1. ice

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel m, n (plural gels)

  1. gel (suspension of solid in liquid)
  2. gel (cosmetic preparation)

AnagramsEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gel

  1. yellow

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gelū, from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold). For the sense of "gel", cf. English gel; compare gélatine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel m (plural gels)

  1. frost
  2. gel (suspension of solid in liquid)
  3. gel (cosmetic preparation)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gel (comparative geler, superlative am gelsten)

  1. (archaic) Alternative spelling of gelb (yellow).

DeclensionEdit


German Low GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gel

  1. Alternative spelling of geel

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel n (genitive singular gels, no plural)

  1. gel

DeclensionEdit


NalcaEdit

NounEdit

gel

  1. woman
  2. wife

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ContractionEdit

gel

  1. Contraction of ge + le (I [] it)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *gelos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₂- (to shine).

AdjectiveEdit

gel

  1. bright
  2. clear
  3. white

DeclensionEdit

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative gel gel gel
Vocative gil*
gel**
Accusative gel gil
Genitive gil gile gil
Dative giul gil giul
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative gil gela
Vocative gilu
gela
Accusative gilu
gela
Genitive gel
Dative gelaib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
gel gel
pronounced with /ɣ(ʲ)-/
ngel
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • 1 gel” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰoylos (frothing, tempestuous, wanton). Cognate with Old English gāl, Dutch geil (salacious, lustful), Old High German geil (German geil (lustful)), Old Norse geiligr (beautiful).

AdjectiveEdit

gēl (comparative gēloro, superlative gēlost)

  1. wanton, lustful; wicked

DeclensionEdit





PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French gel, cf. English gel, gelatine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gel m (plural géis or geles (rare))

  1. gel (suspension of solid in liquid)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From gelatina or borrowed from French gel, cf. English gel, gelatine.

NounEdit

gel m (plural geles)

  1. gel

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English girl.

NounEdit

gel

  1. girl

TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gel

  1. imperative of gelmek