See also: Ger, GER, gér, gèr, Ger⁺⁶, and Ger.

Translingual

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Symbol

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ger

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2/B language code for German.

English

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Mongolian yurts

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Mongolian гэр (ger)/ᠭᠡᠷ (ger).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ger (plural gers)

  1. A yurt.
    • 2007, Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road, Sceptre, published 2008, page 133:
      The new bek's great-grandfather had passed every night of his life under the sky, on the back of a pony or in the felt walls of a ger, and Buljan retained the ancestral contempt for cities and city dwellers.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Hebrew גֵּר (ger).

Noun

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ger (plural gerim)

  1. (Judaism) A male convert to Judaism; a Jewish proselyte.
    Coordinate term: giyoret

Anagrams

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Albanian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Albanian *gaura. Compare Lithuanian gauras (hair, down, tuft of hair), Latvian gauri (pubic hair) and Middle Irish gúaire (hair).[1]

Noun

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ger m

  1. squirrel (furry)
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References

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  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “ger”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 112

Breton

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Etymology

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From Proto-Brythonic *gėr, from Proto-Celtic *garyos (word, speech), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r-.

Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English caru (sorrow).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ger m (plural gerioù)

  1. word
    • 1990, Thomas Arwyn Watkins, Martin John Ball, Celtic Linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: Readings in the Brythonic Languages, page 202:
      Skrijal a rae Loeiz o tistagan ar ger [...] 'Louis screamed in pronouncing the word'.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Inflection

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The template Template:br-noun-mutation does not use the parameter(s):
g=m
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Derived terms

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Chinese

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Etymology 1

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Clipping of English manager.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ger

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, slang) manager
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ger

  1. (Cantonese) Alternative form of (penis)

Etymology 3

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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ger

  1. (Cantonese) Alternative form of (to target, to annoy someone verbally)

Cornish

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Etymology

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From Proto-Brythonic *gėr, from Proto-Celtic *garyos (word, speech), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r-.

Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English ċearu (sorrow).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ger m (plural geryow)

  1. word
  2. saying
  3. report

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Faroese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Verb

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ger

  1. third-person singular present of gera
  2. imperative singular of gera
Conjugation
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Conjugation of gera (group v-31)
infinitive gera
supine gjørt
participle (a7)1 gerandi gjørdur
present past
first singular geri gjørdi
second singular gert gjørdi
third singular ger gjørdi
plural gera gjørdu
imperative
singular ger!
plural gerið!
1Only the past participle being declined.

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse [Term?].

Noun

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ger f (genitive singular gerar, uncountable)

  1. yeast
Declension
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Declension of ger (singular only)
f2s singular
indefinite definite
nominative ger gerin
accusative ger gerina
dative ger gerini
genitive gerar gerarinnar

Icelandic

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Danish gær, from Old Norse gerð, from Proto-Germanic *garwidō.

Noun

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ger n (genitive singular gers, no plural)

  1. yeast
Declension
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Synonyms
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Etymology 2

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From Old Norse gør, from Proto-Germanic *garwiją or *gerwą.

Noun

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ger n (genitive singular gers, no plural)

  1. rotting things (as feed)
  2. flock, swarm (of carrion birds, flies, etc.)
Declension
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Etymology 3

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From Old Norse gerr, gjǫrr, gǫrr, from Proto-Germanic *garwaz.

Adjective

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ger (not comparable)

  1. ready, fully prepared
Inflection
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Etymology 4

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From Old Norse gerr, cognate with Old High German ger (greedy).

Adjective

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ger (comparative gerari, superlative gerastur)

  1. greedy, gluttonous
Inflection
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Etymology 5

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From Old Norse gerr, gjǫrr, gørr, from Proto-Germanic *garwiz, comparative of the adverb corresponding to ger (3).

Adverb

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ger (comparative form; superlative gerst)

  1. better, more thoroughly

References

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Old English

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ġēr n (nominative plural ġēr)

  1. Alternative form of ġēar

Declension

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Old High German

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-West Germanic *gaiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *gaizaz (spear).

Noun

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gēr m

  1. spear
    Synonym: azgēr
Declension
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Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Lombardic: ger
  • Middle High German: gēr

Etymology 2

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From Proto-West Germanic *ger, from Proto-Germanic *geraz.

Adjective

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ger

  1. greedy
Inflection
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This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms
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Old Saxon

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Etymology

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Variant of jār.

Noun

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ger n

  1. year

Declension

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Romanian

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ger

Etymology

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Inherited from Latin gelū, from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [d͡ʒer]
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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ger n (plural geruri)

  1. frost (cold weather that causes frost to form)
  2. frigidness, frosty weather

Declension

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Derived terms

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See also

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Swedish

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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ger

  1. present indicative of ge, contracted from the archaic giver

Welsh

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Etymology

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Probably a mutated form of cer (second-person singular imperative of mynd).

Alternatively, related to er (for, through).

Pronunciation

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Preposition

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ger

  1. next to, near
    Synonyms: ar bwys, gerllaw, yn ymyl
  2. beside
    Synonym: wrth

Derived terms

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References

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “ger”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies