See also: Ger, GER, gér, gèr, Ger⁺⁶, and Ger.

EnglishEdit

 
Mongolian yurts

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Mongolian гэр (ger)/ᠭᠡᠷ (ger).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ger (plural gers)

  1. A yurt.
    • 2007, Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road, Sceptre 2008, p. 133:
      The new bek's great-grandfather had passed every night of his life under the sky, on the back of a pony or in the felt walls of a ger, and Buljan retained the ancestral contempt for cities and city dwellers.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Hebrew גֵּר(ger).

NounEdit

ger (plural gerim)

  1. A male convert to Judaism.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *gaura. Compare Lithuanian gauras (hair, down, tuft of hair), Latvian gauri (pubic hair) and Middle Irish gúaire (hair).[1]

NounEdit

ger m

  1. squirrel (furry)
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “ger”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, page 112

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *gėr, from Proto-Celtic *garyos (word, speech), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r-.

Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English caru (sorrow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ger m (plural gerioù)

  1. word
    • 1990, Thomas Arwyn Watkins, Martin John Ball, Celtic Linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: Readings in the Brythonic Languages. p. 202.
      Skrijal a rae Loeiz o tistagan ar ger [...] 'Louis screamed in pronouncing the word'.

Derived termsEdit

InflectionEdit


CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *gėr, from Proto-Celtic *garyos (word, speech), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵh₂r-, zero grade of *ǵeh₂r-.

Cognate with Ancient Greek γῆρυς (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese [script needed] (ysār-, to sing), Latin garriō (chatter), Old English ċearu (sorrow).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [ɡɛːr]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [ɡeːr]

NounEdit

ger m (plural geryow)

  1. word
  2. saying
  3. report

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

ger

  1. third-person singular present of gera
he, she, it does, makes
  1. imperative singular of gera
do! make!
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse [Term?].

NounEdit

ger f (genitive singular gerar, uncountable)

  1. yeast
DeclensionEdit
Declension of ger (singular only)
f2s singular
indefinite definite
nominative ger gerin
accusative ger gerina
dative ger gerini
genitive gerar gerarinnar

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Danish gær, from Old Norse gerð, from Proto-Germanic *garwidō.

NounEdit

ger n (genitive singular gers, no plural)

  1. yeast
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse gør, from Proto-Germanic *garwiją or *gerwą.

NounEdit

ger n (genitive singular gers, no plural)

  1. rotting things (as feed)
  2. flock, swarm (of carrion birds, flies, etc.)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse gerr, gjǫrr, gǫrr, from Proto-Germanic *garwaz.

AdjectiveEdit

ger (not comparable)

  1. ready, fully prepared
InflectionEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse gerr, cognate with Old High German ger (greedy).

AdjectiveEdit

ger (comparative gerari, superlative gerastur)

  1. greedy, gluttonous
InflectionEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From Old Norse gerr, gjǫrr, gørr, from Proto-Germanic *garwiz, comparative of the adverb corresponding to ger (3).

AdverbEdit

ger (comparative form; superlative gerst)

  1. better, more thoroughly

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Variant of ġēar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ġēr n (nominative plural ġēr)

  1. year
  2. the runic character (/j/)

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gaiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *gaizaz (spear).

NounEdit

gēr m

  1. spear

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: gēr
  • Italian: gherone

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Variant of jār.

NounEdit

ger n

  1. year

DeclensionEdit



RomanianEdit

 
ger

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gelū, from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ger n (plural geruri)

  1. frost (cold weather that causes frost to form)
  2. frigidness, frosty weather

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jeːr/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

ger

  1. present tense of ge., contracted from the archaic giver

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh gor (over, next to), from Old Welsh guor, from Proto-Brythonic *wor, from Proto-Celtic *uɸor (over, next to), from Proto-Indo-European *upér. Cognate with Irish for.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ger

  1. next to
    Synonym: ar bwys

Derived termsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ger

  1. Alternative spelling of gjer