EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Formed in English from the verb gild (to cover in gold). Compare gold and German Geld.

NounEdit

gilt (usually uncountable, plural gilts)

  1. (uncountable) Gold or other metal in a thin layer; gilding.
    1. (uncountable, by extension) Gold-colored paint or other coating.
  2. (uncountable, slang) Money.
  3. (countable, finance) A security issued by the Bank of England (see gilt-edged)
  4. (obsolete, uncountable) A gilded object, an object covered with gold.
    • 1864, “Returns of Church Goods in The Churches of the City of Norwich”, in Commission of 6 Edward VI[1], 1552, quoted in Norfolk Archaeology, Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, page 371:
      The parysh of Seint Powle in Norwiche. Thomas Blocke, George Wylson, Churchwardens. Have sold in plate, gylte and parcell gylte, to the summe of iiij ownce, every ownce at the price of iiijs. viijd.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gilt (comparative more gilt, superlative most gilt)

  1. Golden coloured.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 10, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      The Jones man was looking at her hard. Now he reached into the hatch of his vest and fetched out a couple of cigars, everlasting big ones, with gilt bands on them.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gilt

  1. simple past tense and past participle of gild

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See geld.

NounEdit

gilt (plural gilts)

  1. A young female pig, at or nearing the age of first breeding.
TranslationsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gilt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of gillen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of gillen

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gilt

  1. Third-person singular present of gelten.

KarakalpakEdit

NounEdit

gilt

  1. key