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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scots glamer, from earlier Scots gramarye (magic, enchantment, spell).

The Scottish term may either be from Ancient Greek γραμμάριον (grammárion, gram), the weight unit of ingredients used to make magic potions, or an alteration of the English word grammar (any sort of scholarship, especially occult learning).

A connection has also been suggested with Old Norse glámr (poet. “moon,” name of a ghost) and glámsýni (glamour, illusion, literally glam-sight).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glamour (countable and uncountable, plural glamours)

  1. (countable) An item, motif, person, image that by association improves appearance.
  2. Witchcraft; magic charm; a spell affecting the eye, making objects appear different from what they really are.
    • 1882, James Thomson (B. V.), “The City of Dreadful Night”:
      They often murmur to themselves, they speak
      To one another seldom, for their woe
      Broods maddening inwardly and scorns to wreak
      Itself abroad; and if at whiles it grow
      To frenzy which must rave, none heeds the clamour,
      Unless there waits some victim of like glamour,
      To rave in turn, who lends attentive show.
  3. A kind of haze in the air, causing things to appear different from what they really are.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  4. Any artificial interest in, or association with, an object, or person, through which it or they appear delusively magnified or glorified.
  5. (uncountable) Alluring beauty or charm (often with sex appeal).
    glamour magazines; a glamour model

Alternative formsEdit

  • glamor (US); however, the -our spelling is more common spelling even in the US

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

glamour (third-person singular simple present glamours, present participle glamouring, simple past and past participle glamoured)

  1. (transitive) To enchant; to bewitch.

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English glamour.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡlamuːr/, [ɡ̊laˈmuːɐ̯] or IPA(key): /ɡlamɔr/, [ˈɡ̊lamɒ]

NounEdit

glamour c (singular definite glamouren, not used in plural form)

  1. glamour

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

glamour

  1. glamour (charm)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of glamour (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative glamour glamourit
genitive glamourin glamourien
partitive glamouria glamoureja
illative glamouriin glamoureihin
singular plural
nominative glamour glamourit
accusative nom. glamour glamourit
gen. glamourin
genitive glamourin glamourien
partitive glamouria glamoureja
inessive glamourissa glamoureissa
elative glamourista glamoureista
illative glamouriin glamoureihin
adessive glamourilla glamoureilla
ablative glamourilta glamoureilta
allative glamourille glamoureille
essive glamourina glamoureina
translative glamouriksi glamoureiksi
instructive glamourein
abessive glamouritta glamoureitta
comitative glamoureineen

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. glamour

AdjectiveEdit

glamour (invariable)

  1. glamorous

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English glamour

NounEdit

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English glamour

NounEdit

glamour m (definite singular glamouren)

  1. glamour

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English glamour.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glamour m (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of glamur

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

glamour c (definite singular glamouren) (uncountable)

  1. glamour